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through various hybridity models, each of which recognizes that hybridity is not the simple mixing of once separate and self-contained cultural traditions, but rather . . . the recognition of the fact that all culture is an arena of struggle, where self is played off against the purportedly ‘other,’ and

In: Horizons in Biblical Theology

be too constraining for their now more diverse membership. As I write this paragraph, MECHA leadership has not yet decided on a final name, but for now, they are working under an Espanglish (a hybrid mixture of Spanish and English) acronym: Movimiento Estudiantil Progressive Action ( MEPA ). The

In: Latina/o/x Studies and Biblical Studies

a hybrid of local cultural and Greek elements. This means that, for example, the origin of parables no longer needs to be sought in fables in a mono-causal way; both fables and parables can be seen as mediating a shared cultural background. 12 Through yet another change of context, Sumerian

In: Parables in Changing Contexts

sources and the hybridity of ideology and exegesis in rabbinic midrash. Exegetical concerns inform some of the Jesus parables, and non-exegetical parables (rather problematically labelled as “rhetorical”) are known in early rabbinic sources as well. 9 Luke has Jesus tell the parable of the good Samaritan

In: Parables in Changing Contexts

be too constraining for their now more diverse membership. As I write this paragraph, MECHA leadership has not yet decided on a final name, but for now, they are working under an Espanglish (a hybrid mixture of Spanish and English) acronym: Movimiento Estudiantil Progressive Action ( MEPA ). The

In: Brill Research Perspectives in Biblical Interpretation

:42; Matt 18:6–10; Luke 17:1–4. See Anderson 1976, 237; Hill 1972, 274; Luz 2001, 434. 91 For a more in-depth analysis of the eunuch passage, see Asikainen 2014. 92 Lucian writes that “a eunuch was neither man nor woman (οὔτε ἄνδρα οὔτε γυναῖκα) but something composite, hybrid, and monstrous, alien to human

In: Jesus and Other Men

goes to the heart of postcoloniality as a political posture and practice. Homi Bhabha’s intervention with the notions of mimicry and hybridity offers a partial path out of this aporia. Bhabha, in breaking with Fanon’s idea that the colonized has only the choice to either “turn white or disappear

In: Brill Research Perspectives in Biblical Interpretation

. Homi K. Bhabha ( 1994 ) introduces the concepts of ambivalence, mimicry, and hybridity in the colonial encounter. For Bhabha, the rhetoric of the colonizers betrays ambivalence—the subject peoples are considered inferior but also desirable. In addition, the subject peoples are ambivalent about the

In: Brill Research Perspectives in Biblical Interpretation

of representing the ‘Other’, often along the lines of the dynamics of ‘orientalism’ (Said 1978 ), while the postcolonial subject often seeks to express resistance against such discourse through mimicry and the creation of hybrid identities, in order to gain an audible voice in the dominant discourse

In: Brill Research Perspectives in Biblical Interpretation

digital. Such convergence is already evident in (analog) comic books and graphic novels and (analog and digital) “audible books.” Such hybrid forms confuse any distinction between written and non-written text. The very concept of “medium” may need rethinking. For example, the differences between a written

In: Brill Research Perspectives in Biblical Interpretation