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different concepts of uniformity under the same rubric: that is, the methodological uniformity of law and process and the empirical or hypothetical uniformity of the geological transformations. The first one has to do with fundamental assumptions that “natural laws are constant in space and time” and that

In: American History in Transition

steady movement” of history would entail a methodological blindness to individual details: If the historian will only consent to shut his eyes for a moment to the microscopic analysis of personal motives and idiosyncrasies, he cannot but become conscious of a silent pulsation that commands his respect, a

In: American History in Transition

the History, Condition and Prospects of the Indian Tribes of the United States , 6 vols. (Philadelphia: Lippincott, Grambo & Company, 1851–57). This table is created from the third volume, page ix This methodological relationship with ethnology suggested at least two things about Parkman’s history

In: American History in Transition

society, the world in perpetual transition. The new recognition of a transitory and malleable reality then required new styles of history writing, and this challenged American historians to rethink and reform their entire methodology. As the following chapters illustrate, historians in those days found

In: American History in Transition

of American geographic history. Still, Willard’s methodology went a step further to a firmer consolidation of geography and history. She did not just follow tradition but took it to its utmost limit, so that the nature of geographic history presented itself even more distinctly in her writings. After

In: American History in Transition

, too, the renewed perception of time brought forth a new type of historical narrative. Historians found a methodological possibility in geology because of its theoretical potency as a historical science. George Bancroft, one of the most eminent American historians of the day, once designated the

In: American History in Transition

redundant, segment of the series. The trilogy has never been discussed in its totality due to its alleged lack of methodological unity. 1 Nonetheless, in my view, the generic mixture or apparent dissonance of natural-historical cataloging and historical narrative did not indicate that Belknap’s books

In: American History in Transition