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languages. 4 In this context, the aim of the present volume is to sample the various aspects of the transmission of translated patristic works (broadly conceived) in Late Antiquity and beyond, being meant as a propaedeutical and exploratory step for a corpus-based versional project over the following years

In: Caught in Translation: Studies on Versions of Late-Antique Christian Literature

was compiled; (4), it can also give us a better understanding of the Sogdian version and of the practices of translating Patristic texts from Syriac to Sogdian, and finally, (5) it can elucidate some of the obscure Sogdian words used by the translator(s). For the present paper, I will mainly focus on

In: Caught in Translation: Studies on Versions of Late-Antique Christian Literature

, introducing and securing basic ideas of Christian cosmology. The textual relationships and dependencies within the Šestodnev and its (not always consistent) worldview sadly remain understudied, in spite of its great resonance in the Slavia orthodoxa . The present article will not focus on the early

In: Caught in Translation: Studies on Versions of Late-Antique Christian Literature

spices, their traditional association with either heat or coldness, 9 as well as their appearance in scripture. Firstly, henna and nard are presented by Gregory as a good combination of warmth and fragrance. 10 Next, as saffron is neither very hot nor very cold Gregory associates it with virtue as the

In: Caught in Translation: Studies on Versions of Late-Antique Christian Literature

the letter to the Romans, included in the Acts of Martyr Ignatius was translated into the Syriac, Coptic, Armenian and Arabic versions of this text. These versions, combined with the theory of three recensions, form a remarkably complex manuscript transmission which is rarely presented in hardly any

In: Caught in Translation: Studies on Versions of Late-Antique Christian Literature

study like the present one, not all of them can be examined in closer detail. We have opted for the most economic solution, namely to examine most of the manuscripts that are available online. These were the following, in chronological order (marked with a star are the witnesses already collated by

In: Caught in Translation: Studies on Versions of Late-Antique Christian Literature

issue of the selection process in the Armenian tradition cannot be, at present, satisfactorily answered on the basis of the currently available data. After the pioneering work on the Armenian reception of John Chrysostom published by Giovanni Aucher in 1908, 6 no further comprehensive study has been

In: Caught in Translation: Studies on Versions of Late-Antique Christian Literature

of Coptic literature, but this is an aspect that goes beyond the scope of the present contribution 4 —is evidenced by a combination of well-known historical and codicological data. I shall confine myself to mention here at least two generally overlooked points substantiating this claim, namely, on

In: Caught in Translation: Studies on Versions of Late-Antique Christian Literature

the patriarch personally. 7 Further information can be inferred from his name as presented in manuscripts of his works. In the text discussed below, he is referred to as ‮ابراهيم الابرطسبثار والكاتب الملكي بن يوحنّا الانطاكي‬‎ (Ibrāhīm the protospatharios and royal scribe, son of Yuḥannā, of Antioch

In: Caught in Translation: Studies on Versions of Late-Antique Christian Literature

impossible that some errors exist. Despite these possible deficiencies, it has seemed best to the present author to publish this material in the scientific record in its entirety so that this valuable witness can play a role in the text-critical study of the Shepherd of Hermas even if the manuscript

In: Caught in Translation: Studies on Versions of Late-Antique Christian Literature