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Author: Sadi Maréchal

The late antique papyri concerning baths and bathing habits are arranged chronologically, each papyrus having a code starting with P. The ostraca are grouped separately, each entry starting with an O-code. For each papyrus, the following information is presented: Ref. Reference to the

In: Public Baths and Bathing Habits in Late Antiquity
Author: Sadi Maréchal

little changed in Late Antiquity. If one considers the collective immersion pools as the most characteristic element, especially in comparison to the Greek-style baths (however, see the remarks by Monica Trümper presented in chapter 1), one will conclude that late antique baths had turned towards a more

In: Public Baths and Bathing Habits in Late Antiquity
Author: Risa Levitt

Tabernacle, the two biblical elements directly tied to God’s presence, are not present in the second Temple, and this may have opened the door to some dismay with the view that everything in Israel had gone back to the way it was before the Exile. 3 Even before the destruction of the second Temple in 70 CE

In: Contextualizing Jewish Temples

of organized worship in them. Even when temples were not present in the physical landscape, they continue to figure prominently in ancient Jewish “mental space,” as a locus of both memories about the past and aspirations for the future. Temples, however, did not exist in a splendidly isolated

In: Contextualizing Jewish Temples
Author: Paul M. Joyce

of evidence and the lack of assured criteria for its assessment. The picture presented here is so divergent from what we postulate of the restoration reality that one might argue that if the Second Temple had already been inaugurated (as it was in about 515 BCE ) it would have been difficult to

In: Contextualizing Jewish Temples
Author: Sadi Maréchal

chapter commenced. By including the second half of the 7th c., we could (theoretically) observe how the Roman-style baths in North Africa and the Middle East ‘survived’ the first decades of Muslim rule. The further development of bathing habits under Early Islam will only be presented as an ‘epilogue’, as

In: Public Baths and Bathing Habits in Late Antiquity
Author: Eyal Regev

identity. The Temple tax tradition functions like a parable about the relationship of Matthew’s followers to other Jews. It is meant to show that, either in the past or present, the followers of Jesus are within Israel, expressing conciliation toward the Jews. Readers are urged to avoid unnecessary

In: Contextualizing Jewish Temples

and holiness, approaches to worship, and theology. 9 This is certainly the case with the Israelite Temples known from archaeological research or from literary sources. 10 The architect of the Temple plan of the Temple Scroll certainly intended to convey such messages. The present study seeks to

In: Contextualizing Jewish Temples
Author: Yuval Levavi

The present contribution examines concepts of service and duty within Neo-Babylonian temples as reflected in the administrative letters from the archive of the Eanna temple in Uruk. 1 Following a brief survey of the administrative structure of Eanna, I will focus on the use of the Babylonian

In: Contextualizing Jewish Temples
Author: Avraham Faust

Israel and Judah. 37 Still, the only temple that was unearthed in archaeological excavations and whose plan is clear, i.e., the one at Arad, 38 along with the Jerusalem temple according to the biblical description, present a clear picture of very hierarchical approach (Figures 5.7, 5.8). 39 The temple

In: Contextualizing Jewish Temples