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Pei-Yin Lin

Employing the term “translation” as problematics of aboriginal representations in colonial Taiwan, this paper examines how primitivity or exotica of the colonized (the Atayal people) is rendered in Shimizu Hiroshi’s film ‘Sayon’s Bell’ (1943) and other retellings of Sayon Hayun’s story. To highlight the asymmetrical power relations embedded in colonial exchange through translation, this paper first examines Japanese colonizers ’ construction of savagery and civility, analyzing the transfiguring process in which Taiwan’s aborigines are transformed from the savage other to martyred imperial subjects. It then draws on Venuti’s notions of “domestication” and “foreignization”, regarding the dissemination of Japanese colonial discourse as the former whereas the capture of Taiwanese aborigines’ ethnic/racial particularity the latter. Rather than reading the film as an exemplary national-policy film, this paper argues Shimizu’s meditative role as a cultural translator actually creates a space of slippage within colonial discourse as the film contains both domesticating and foreignizing translation tactics. Accordingly, Shimizu’s cinematic techniques and Li Xianglan’s transnational identity suggest more contradictions and ambiguities within imperialization discourse than a clear-cut reinforcement of it.

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Yang Xiaobin

Almost all major Chinese poets in the post-Mao era have been enthusiastic in writing about their western (post-)modernist forerunners. In a way, this can be understood as translation of the great Western minds into the Chinese context. But if translation is etymologically synonymous to transference, we can discover that the process of translation can also be seen as that of transference in the psychoanalytic sense that links the Western masters (as texts) and their Chinese followers (as readers): the latter, nevertheless, transfer back feelings onto the former. This paper examines, with the help of the Lacanian theory of transference, how the Chinese poets address their sentiments, in different ways, to the presumably authoritative other. The major trends of transcultural transference in recent Chinese poetry correspond to the three Lacanian registers of the imaginary, the symbolic and the real: (1) imaginary identification with the other as the ideal-ego to create an intact, narcissistic, albeit illusionary, mirror image; (2) symbolic identification with the big Other as the ego-ideal that is expected to construct a modern(ized) cultural subject; and (3) transformation of the Other into an objet petit a as the way to invoke the ever-eluding desire and approach the traumatic core of the impossibility of identification or self-identity.

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David Holm and Meng Yuanyao

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Joyce C. H. Liu

Wang Guowei's translations of utilitarian ethics and education theory reveal clearly the role that he played at Education World and as a Chinese intellectual. His participation in the public discourse fit into the plans of Luo Zhenyu both at the journal and later at the Ministry of Education of the late Qing government. Those theories of ethics and education Wang and Luo introduced became the main axis of Chinese ethical thought throughout the twentieth century; they defined the terms in which the subject related to society or the state. This essay points out that, during his exploration of the limits of Western and classical Chinese ethics, Wang’s own philosophical writings at the time analyzed the limitations of dualism in the ethical discourse both in the West and in Chinese classical philosophy. Wang demonstrated a critique of utilitarianism and life-ism (生生主義) that was popular at the time. As well as a critique, he also developed an aesthetic and ethical view: no-life-ism (無生主義).

Arthur Cooper

Edited by Imre Galambos

quite natural and obvious to the Greeks when producing a dictionary of their own language, unless it is a specialised dictionary of modern spoken or ‘Demotic’ Greek only, or of Homer or some other specialised subject, to include all Greek in it. Before me for instance is a dictionary published in

Arthur Cooper

Edited by Imre Galambos

disjunctive ; not quite like our notions of a subject being linked to the verb, and the verb to an object. “ A Balbus (& Co.) Built Wall”, however, can when necessary, be distinguished from this sentence by giving warning of the coming conjunction of an object, that is, an object in Chinese grammatical

Arthur Cooper

Edited by Imre Galambos

politics and other such subjects proper to poets, have reservations about his work in general. His youth was undoubtedly wild, and in it he played the part of what is variously translated ‘knight-errant’ and, rather more appropriately, ‘roving brave’. ‘Condottiere’ might also convey the meaning. He duelled

Arthur Cooper

Edited by Imre Galambos

be kept out and subjects of the Empire to be kept at home (these were always, as much as direct defence, the purposes of the Great Wall); lest China’s superior technology got into the wrong hands. In such a state of confidence it was natural for the Ch’ien Lung Emperor (1736–1796) to regard Lord

Arthur Cooper

Edited by Imre Galambos

which he addressed to the Emperor on the subject during his term as an ‘Omissioner’ together with others on other subjects, survive amongst his Collected Works; and their courage and outspokenness—even though in the accepted tradition of that office—are striking. Po Chü-i believed in the Confucian

Arthur Cooper

Edited by Imre Galambos

man (man of the country).’ (378 A ) 臣 minister In this 臣 (378 A ) ‘chén’ is ‘a servant; subject, minister’. 大臣 (110 G …) ‘dàchén’ is a ‘Minister, Principal Secretary of State’ in a monarchy; in Sino-Japanese, ‘daijin’: 外務大臣 (151 B  – 141 A …), ‘gaimudaijin’ in Japanese, is the ‘(Imperial) Secretary