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In: Contested Issues in Christian Origins and the New Testament
In: The Significance of Sinai
In: For the Comfort of Zion
In: Mark's Memory Resources and the Controversy Stories (Mark 2:1-3:6)
In: Incubation as a Type-Scene in the Aqhatu, Kirta, and Hannah Stories

clarify matters. The relationship between the prefect and his subject is clearly hierarchical. 15 The members of the city are beholden to the prefect’s authority and are required to act submissively. As such, the man’s response is surprising. The subject turns the question right back at the prefect: “I

In: Parables in Changing Contexts

historically located ‘me’. It is only this ‘me’, the subject who hears or reads the parable, who can decide for the moral lesson by applying it to ‘my’ life. In short: parables address the individual more than they do the collective. By comparing fables, parables, similes and stories, it is unavoidable that

In: Parables in Changing Contexts

. “ The Use of Midrash for Social History .” In Current Trends in the Study of Midrash , edited by Carol Bakhos . Leiden : Brill , 2006 , 133 – 160 . Levinson , Joshua . “ Post Classical Narratology and the Rabbinic Subject .” In Narratology, Hermeneutics, and Midrash: Jewish, Christian, and

In: Parables in Changing Contexts

, but also as pimps for their slaves. 5 For this reason, caution was needed on the part of the slave buyers; they could easily be misled by cunning salesmen. 6 The practice of the selling of slaves, together with debts as one of the reasons why people were sold as slaves, forms the subject of this

In: Parables in Changing Contexts

no exception among the subject matter of the humanities, where it is advised always to be open to the usefulness of both literary and historical approaches. 2 1 Disproportionality and Schematization Parables are peculiar stories. They have an ambiguous relation to reality and may misrepresent certain

In: Parables in Changing Contexts