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Author: James D. Dvorak

or to contract the semiotic “space” between their own ideologically-based value position(s) and those of others that are referenced in text. 183 By doing so, the writer takes up a certain stance or subject position (i.e., creates a textual axiology) and naturalizes a certain reading position

In: The Interpersonal Metafunction in 1 Corinthians 1–4
Author: James D. Dvorak

depicted actions and any praiseworthiness attached to them away from the readers and to the Agent, God. Additionally, there are only two active verbs in the thanksgiving unit, namely εὐχαριστῶ (v. 4) of which Paul is the subject/Actor, and the future form βεβαιώσει (v. 8) of which God is the subject

In: The Interpersonal Metafunction in 1 Corinthians 1–4
Author: James D. Dvorak

appraised than toward a subjective appraiser; values of appraisal are presented as properties of that which is appraised rather than to some human subject who gives the appraisal. 72 For this reason, appreciations are relatively less explicitly subjective than affective evaluations. Table 9 Examples

In: The Interpersonal Metafunction in 1 Corinthians 1–4
Author: James D. Dvorak

, “Idea of Purity,” 93–94. 67 Fee, First Epistle , 149. 68 The clause ὅτι ἐν πυρὶ ἀποκαλύπτεται (for [the day] is revealed with fire) is monoglossic, stating the cause/reason as a “given.” On reading ἡµέρα as subject of ἀποκαλύπτεται , see Fee, First Epistle , 142. 69 Porter

In: The Interpersonal Metafunction in 1 Corinthians 1–4