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In: Pleasure and Pain in Nineteenth-Century French Literature and Culture
In: Katherine Mansfield’s French Lives
In: Perspectives on the ‘Other America’

’s second sermon is as different from his first as its content. He is gentler, he does not say “you” any longer but rather “we.” And perhaps more telling still, he stumbles over his words (P 182, OC II 188). Paneloux’s growing uncertainty and humility are signs of his healing and maturation, though his

In: Brill's Companion to Camus

, which leaves the other alone, outside, over there, in his death, outside of us”. 15 In her essay on Levinas and Kristeva, Ewa Ziarek draws out the logical conclusion to Derrida’s argument by claiming that the melancholic’s inability to heal from grief must be recognized as a valiant refusal, undertaken

In: Brill's Companion to Camus

failing to attain the good life. The sufferers of ressentiment “rip open the oldest wounds and make themselves bleed to death from scars long-since healed, they make evil-doers out of friend, wife, child, and anyone else near to them”. 20 According to Nietzsche, slave ressentiment not only targets

In: Brill's Companion to Camus

melancholy of Plotinus, it provides modern anguish the means of calming itself in the familiar setting of the eternal.” (MS 48–49, OC I 252) Yet nostalgia cannot heal absurdity: “The absurd mind has less luck. For it the world is neither so rational nor so irrational. It is unreasonable and only that.” (MS

In: Brill's Companion to Camus

[…] our only justification, if there is one, is to talk […] in the name of all those, indeed, who are suffering right now” (RRD 194, OC IV 261). Morisi proposes this explanation: “According to Camus, it is not that the work of art contains some healing virtue or corrective magic, when it is solidary in

In: Brill's Companion to Camus

by satisfying them but by healing us of them, mortifying our self-love rather than feeding it”. There have been renowned attempts to establish connections between French existentialist thinkers and their philosophical predecessors of the rationalistic background. Post-Heideggerian studies frequently

In: Brill's Companion to Camus