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Abstract

Both Antonin Artaud and Gilles Deleuze have diagnosed our Western European civilization with symptoms as sick, sluggish and worn-out. We live in a world where we do still not know what the book-body is capable of and still hold to a paranoid and narcotizing fixity within body, mind and language; we live in an age where the vital and healthy link between man and his body is broken. Alluding to Artaud as a genuine initiator, pioneer and physician in the process of healing the broken link between man and his body, Deleuze contends we need a belief in this world, which is a commitment and conversion to absolute immanence. This chapter firstly discusses Deleuze’s conception of the healthy link between man and his body after which it investigates in what way Artaud’s writings engage with the vitality of our body and how his linguistic devotion to absolute immanence will give us reasons to believe in this world, this life and this body.

In: This Deleuzian Century

Abstract

This paper focuses on the gwātī healing ritual practiced in the Sarhadd region of Iranian Baluchistan. Though the gwātī ritual is widespread all over Baluchistan (both in Iranian and Pakistani sides) and its central pattern is relatively common in different locations, however the homegrown varieties of the ritual are quite interesting from the anthropological perspective. The data for this article has been collected in the Sarhadd region of Iranian Baluchistan during the ethnographic fieldwork in 2012.

In: Studies on Iran and The Caucasus

science , and an occult one at that. We must wield it, lest it wield us. As Pollock warns: “A double historicization is required, that of the philologist—and we philologists historicize ourselves as rarely as physicians heal themselves—no less than that of the text.” 65 While he declines to doubly

In: Philological Encounters
In: Restoring the Mystery of the Rainbow (2 Vols.)

). My reading is moored to Van der Merwe and Gobodo-Madikizela’s book Narrating our Healing 2 which demonstrates quite lucidly the functionality of stories and storytelling as spaces of healing and the centrality of narration to the rediscovery of an erstwhile ruptured sense of self. I frame this

In: Matatu

. Like Dikosha, the Barwa “play with the darkness”. The male dancers surround Dikosha with their erect penises, euphemistically referred to as “maleness”, “pointed unflinchingly at her.” This virility is not sexual, however, but indicative of an energy harnessed for healing. There is a female component

In: Matatu

grievously mangled bodies have never before been seen in Ethiopia. The girl never speaks except to murmur “Abbaye” (father) on two occasions. 39 The constantly guarded patient slowly improves in health, but the effectiveness of his healing confronts Hailu with a dilemma: for whom—or what 40 —is he healing

In: Matatu

aimed at educating, feeding and protecting them and even healing them when they are sick, among other responsibilities of either the state to its citizens or the church to its members. However, the text constructs a counter-discourse to this by showing the spirits of the ancestors taking care of their

In: Matatu

European Ideas 41.7 (2015): 858–882. 25 Michael T. Taussig, Mimesis and Alterity: a particular history of the senses (New York: Routledge, 1993). 26 Michael T. Taussig, Shamanism, Colonialism, and the Wild Man: a study in terror and healing (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1986); Michael T

In: Matatu

Abstract

It is not well known that the great natural philosopher Sir Isaac Newton looked to the Biblical revelations in the setting of Mount Ararat as the key to the solution of early modern Europe’s socioreligious ills. When Jesus gave his twin commandments to love God and one’s fellow humans, in Newton’s view he was distilling the Seven Precepts delivered to Noah after the Flood, regulations accepted in Judaism as preparatory to the Ten Commandments. For Newton this primary ‘true religion’ had the power to heal the nations, and this paper explores how this platform and Newton’s irenic commitments were taken up in the transition from the ‘Scientific Revolution’ to the eighteenth century’s ‘Enlightenment.’ His position connects with the agendas of Locke, Voltaire, Montesquieu, Rousseau, Priestly and Paine (among others), and, although the appeal to the twin loves of God and neighbour were often eviscerated of their original religious purport, they persisted in the development of modern political liberalism, lying behind John Stuart Mill’s dictum that we can do what we like so long as we do not harm others.

In: Studies on Iran and The Caucasus