Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 33 of 33 items for :

  • All: chinese x
  • Type: Major Reference Work x
  • Biblical Studies x
  • Chapters/Articles x
Clear All Modify Search

from Middle Persian tahm “strong”; cf. D. Durkin-Meisterernst, Dictionary of Manichaean Texts . Vol. 3: Texts from Central Asia and China . Part 1: Dictionary of Manichaean Middle Persian and Parthian (Corpus Fontium Manichaeorum, Subsidia; Turnhout: Brepols, 2004), 323b. (D.N. MacKenzie, A

In: Syriac Hagiography

was a collaborative effort. We shall thus consider Knorr to be its sole author. 1 Mingjun-Lu, The Chinese Impact upon English Renaissance Literature: A Globalization and Liberal Cosmopolitan Approach to Donne and Milton (London: Routledge, 2015): pp. 89–92 used here. For his

In: Messias Puer: Christian Knorr von Rosenroth’s Lost Exegesis of Kabbalistic Christianity

futuri [30] sint participes juxta Rom. 11, 26. Unde & Nomina illorum inscripta erant 3 portis Novæ 4 Hierosolymæ 5 Ap. 21, 12. Sive dicamus decem tribus alicubi superesse adhuc 6 , ut in America seu 7 meridionali; in China & in planitie quadam Persiæ inter asperimos montes sita; sive Animas illarum

In: Messias Puer: Christian Knorr von Rosenroth’s Lost Exegesis of Kabbalistic Christianity

Mani’s Pictures: The Didactic Images of the Manichaeans from Sasanian Mesopotamia to Uygur Central Asia and Tang-Ming China . Nag Hammadi and Manichaean Studies 90. Leiden: Brill. Hill, J. Hamlyn 2001 The Earliest Life of Christ Ever Compiled from the Four

In: Manichaeism and Early Christianity

in Syriac: First Editions, New Editions, and Studies . CFM , Series Syriaca  I. Turnhout, 245–267. Gulácsi, Z. (2016): Mani’s Pictures. The Didactic Images of the Manichaeans from Sasanian Mesopotamia to Uygur Central Asia and Tang-Ming China . NHMS  90. Leiden, Boston

In: Manichaeism and Early Christianity
Author: Mattias Brand

.N.C. Lieu, Manichaeism in the Later Roman Empire and Medieval China , 2nd edition ed. (Tübingen Mohr Siebeck, 1992), 86–120. 17 I. Gardner, The Founder of Manichaeism (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2020), 58. 18 For more references to the Greek use of the term, see S. Daris, Il Lessico Latino

In: Manichaeism and Early Christianity
Author: Dylan M. Burns

. Lieu, Samuel N.C. Manichaeism in the Later Roman Empire and Medieval China . Wissenschaftliche Untersuchungen zum Neuen Testament 63. Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck, 1992. Marjanen, Antti. “The Seven Women Disciples in the Two Versions of the First Apocalypse of James .” Pages 535

In: Manichaeism and Early Christianity

material in Chinese, Turkic, and Latin. 7 Nils Arne Pedersen leads the Project, where participants also are Claudia Leurini (in charge of the Iranian sources), John Møller Larsen (the Semitic sources), and myself (the Coptic and Greek sources). 8 The Gospel of Thomas -appendix lists six quotations and

In: Manichaeism and Early Christianity

College Press, 1991), 35–55. 3 See Samuel Lieu, Manichaeism in Mesopotamia and the Roman East (Leiden: Brill, 1994), 80 f. 4 See Samuel Lieu’s discussion of Diocletian’s response to Manichaeism in his Manichaeism in the Later Roman Empire and Medieval China: A Historical Survey

In: Manichaeism and Early Christianity
Author: Therese Fuhrer

.), Die Tücke des Objekts (Berlin) 230–249. Lieu (1992): Samuel N.C. Lieu, Manichaeism in the Later Roman Empire and Medieval China (Tübingen). Mayer (1986–1994): Cornelius Mayer, ‘Allegoria’, Augustinus-Lexikon 1, coll. 234

In: Manichaeism and Early Christianity

Ages,” in: Elizabeth Kefallinos (ed.), Thinking Diversely: Hellenism and the Challenge of Globalisation (special edition of Modern Greek Studies (Australia and New Zealand) , 2012), pp. 91-108; Ken Parry, “Byzantine-Rite Christians (Melkites) in Central Asia and China and Their Contacts with the

In: Scrinium

. This peace facilitated new commercial and diplomatic networks that connected Cairo with the Black Sea in the North, the Horn of Africa in the south, and Indian and China in the East. In these networks Jewish traders took an active part. From 1250 onwards, the Cairo Genizah offers less information about

In: Israel in Egypt: The Land of Egypt as Concept and Reality for Jews in Antiquity and the Early Medieval Period

immigrants,’ either from within the Dār al-Islām extending from Spain to the Chinese borders, or coming from Christian Byzantium, Italy or even Northern Europe. This specifically Jewish multiculturalism functioned within a larger multicultural city, where alongside the Muslim population (itself coming from

In: Israel in Egypt: The Land of Egypt as Concept and Reality for Jews in Antiquity and the Early Medieval Period
Author: Alfred Schmid

in heaven might serve as paradigms for social order and structure was common in ancient China, where the constellations around the polar star (which signified the monarch) were thought to be the models for the imperial bureaucracy [ Needham 1974 , 68 ff.; Lloyd and Sivin 2002 , 223]. In Mesopotamia

In: Hellenistic Astronomy

writing systems. 8 Lev Nikolayevich Menshikov (1926–2005): an Orientalist and Chinese scholar, a specialist in the Dunhuang manuscripts and Chinese vulgar literature ( bianwen ). 9 Georgiy Alexandrovich Zograf (1928–1993): an Orientalist specializing in Indian studies, linguist and translator, author of

In: Armenia between Byzantium and the Orient

seas, and ravening monsters; and the bas-reliefs of Sogdian Zoroastrian tombs in China, notably the sarcophagus of Wirkak, portray the scene: travelers, bridge, cliffs, turbulent waters, and the gnashing jaws of monsters hungry for the flesh of the damned. Frightening afterworlds are a commonplace of

In: Armenia between Byzantium and the Orient
Author: Pavel B. Lurje

first glance does not have anything to do with Iranian religions. The popular variant form of this name is Vaiśramaṇa (in Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit), Pali Vessamaṇa , Uigur Bisamin , Chinese Pisha(men) 毘沙門, Early Middle Chinese *bji-şai-mən and ultimately Japanese Bishamonten . 16 In Hindu

In: Armenia between Byzantium and the Orient
Author: Benjamin Ziemer

, Sogdisch, Uigurisch und weiteren Sprachen erhalten. 87 Dass deren Verbreitungsgebiet von der Atlantikküste bis nach China reichte, führte Milik zu dem Schluss: »No work of Ancient Jewish literature had in antiquity a circulation comparable with that of the Book of Giants.« 88 Die Inanspruchnahme durch

In: Kritik des Wachstumsmodells
In: Protestant Bible Translation and Mandarin as the National Language of China
In: Protestant Bible Translation and Mandarin as the National Language of China
In: Protestant Bible Translation and Mandarin as the National Language of China
In: Protestant Bible Translation and Mandarin as the National Language of China
In: Protestant Bible Translation and Mandarin as the National Language of China
In: Protestant Bible Translation and Mandarin as the National Language of China
In: Protestant Bible Translation and Mandarin as the National Language of China
In: Protestant Bible Translation and Mandarin as the National Language of China
In: Protestant Bible Translation and Mandarin as the National Language of China
In: Byzantine Narrative
In: Byzantine Narrative
In: Protestant Bible Translation and Mandarin as the National Language of China
In: Isaac Vossius (1618-1689) between Science and Scholarship