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Economy, Education, Environment, Law, Population and Labor, and Society

The Chinese Research Perspectives Online includes English translations of contributions selected from the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences Yearbooks. The Chinese-language CASS Yearbooks, published by Social Sciences Academic Press, are edited principally by leading researchers from CASS and other top research institutions and universities in China. The Yearbooks include up-to-date information, data and discussions of China’s top scholars on contemporary issues in their country. The English-language Chinese Research Perspectives Online covers six subject areas*: Economy, Education, the Environment, Legal Development, Population and Labor, and Society. Each subject area has an international editorial board to review and select contributions that provide English readers with firsthand information and insights produced by Chinese scholars. The selected contributions are translated into English and included in this Chinese Research Perspectives Online, which provides interested students, scholars and policy makers with rich source materials on the current developments and trends of a wide range of social aspects in China.

*Among the six subject areas, Economy and Legal Development were terminated since 2012. The other four subject areas continue to have annual updates in this online product.

Brill's Chinese - English Dictionary Online starts off with the Student's Dictionary of Classical and Medieval Chinese. Compiled by Paul W. Kroll and a small group of assisting scholars, it is a practical lexicon of more than 8,000 characters. Arranged alphabetically by Pinyin romanization, this long-awaited tool facilitates reading historical, literary, and religious texts dating from, in the first place, the Warring States period through the Tang dynasty. The dictionary is primarily a zidian 字典, not a cidian 詞典, but in addition to single-graph entries includes an abundance of lianmianci 連綿詞 and important compounds, as well as accurate identifications of plants, animals, and assorted technical terms in various fields. In short, an essential tool and the English-language resource of choice for students of pre-Song texts, and far beyond. And for years to come.
" Brill’s North-China Daily News database is extremely impressive. It presents very clear scanned images of newspapers on a user-friendly operating system.” -- Xiang Fen Ph.D., Associate Researcher, Journalism and Communication Institute, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences

" An invaluable primary source for historical research on the modern period, especially China … This new Online Primary Source will enable far-reaching historical research and encourage the spirit of scholarly enquiry among historians of modern East Asia.” -- Liu Wennan Ph.D., Associate Researcher, Institute of Modern History, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences

" This expanded collection is an essential source for scholars of the history of international relations in pre- and immediate post-war East Asia … This database set provides not only the daily edition, but also substantial holdings of the weekend magazines, supplements, the Municipal Gazette and books and pamphlets from the newspaper’s imprint.” -- Professor Dr. Sven Saaler, Sophia University, Japan

" An excellent additional resource. Its great value lies in the more ephemeral material not included in the Herald: in particular advertisements (of all kinds), and announcements … What you get is much more depth and texture, and also a much firmer sense of key events unfolding.” -- Professor Robert Bickers, University of Bristol

Brill’s relaunched and expanded North-China Daily News is great news for scholars of China and East Asia from the 1860s to the mid-19th century. Except for a wartime break, 1941-45, this was the most influential and informative English-language daily in East Asia. Even though it serves as a catalogue of the sins of the West in the ‘century of national humiliation’, ca.1839-1949, it is the unwitting journal of record for China’s recovery of full nationhood as it struggled against foreign incursions, warlordism, chaos, invasion and civil war to the unification of October 1949.

Extra content
North-China Daily News has a greatly expanded run of the Daily edition from 1869-1949 and some terrific extras, including unique colour holdings of the Sunday Magazine and Special Supplements, a significant run of the Municipal Gazette, organ of the Shanghai Municipal Council from 1908-1940, and a terrific selection of rare books and pamphlets from the imprint of the North-China Daily News and its parent publisher, the North-China Herald.

Uniquely broad and outspoken news coverage
The North-China Daily News is far more than an expanded form of the North-China Herald. This busy daily published around 70 percent more news than the Herald, 70 per cent more pictorial and advertising content, and around 40 percent more textual content overall. But the North-China Daily News was far more than an expanded version of the North-China Herald, because a great deal of the North-China Daily News material was unique and not republished in the Herald.

The social economy
The “Old Lady of the Bund”, as it was known to Shanghai residents, tracked all key news developments and commercial news both in China and throughout East Asia. It recorded the social life of the foreign settlements in photographs and editorial comment. It records the frenetic economy of Shanghai and the ‘Outports’ with hard-working classified ads and Personal and Wanted Notices. It advised its readers on their book choices, ushering in the moves and modern music in the Cinema and entertainment pages. There were Woman’s Pages on Mondays and Thursdays. The full-colour illustrated North China Sunday News Magazines are a unique record of settler China at ease. The Correspondence pages ran excitable and heated reader’s exchanges, most written anonymously.

Published here in full colour 300 ppi scans from original issues and grayscale, this collection offers also offers the only complete run of the works of “Sapajou”, arguably the greatest of all Shanghai’s topical artists, during his tenure at the North-China Daily News, 1923-1941. Sources: Waseda University, British Library, and Private Collection
The Compilation of Chinese Medicine Periodicals Online, 1897-1952 is a collection of 49 periodicals on Chinese medicine published in the late Qing and Republican periods in China. This collection includes 212 books in 5 parts of more than 120,000 pages. The late Qing and Republican eras are crucial periods to the development of medicine and science in China. Considered one of the best sources for observing the changing nature of medical practice and education during the late Qing and Republican eras in China, this collection provides unique insight into not only the modern transformation of Chinese medicine, but also the larger role of medicine in Chinese society. This collection includes published documents authored by prominent figures both in support of, and opposed to, Chinese medicine. The periodicals included in this collection are among the oldest, most influential and authoritative of all scholarship on Chinese medicine from the late Qing and Republican periods. The content has important reference value and unique academic significance for research on Chinese medicine as well as Chinese culture, history and society. The periodicals included are both aged and rare. The editorial team worked with over 50 libraries to compile them all together in this work. The print version of this collection was jointly published in Chinese by Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine and Shanghai Lexicographical Publishing House in 2012. Brill was granted the exclusive rights in 2017 to distribute the online version of this collection. Key features - Chinese material plus English overviews; - A massive primary source collection that includes 212 volumes in 5 parts of approximately 120,000 pages; - Two extensive, full-text searchable Indexes: Index by Author and Index by Category; - Both print and online versions are available.
The English-language North China Herald is the prime printed source in any language for the history of the foreign presence in China from around 1850 to 1940s. During this so-called ‘treaty century’ (1842-1943) the Western Powers established a strong presence in China through their protected enclaves in major cities. It was published weekly in Shanghai, at the heart of China’s encounter with the Euro-American world in a city at the forefront of developments in Chinese politics, culture, education and the economy. As the official journal for British consular notifications, and announcements of the Shanghai Municipal Council, it is the first -- and sometimes only -- point of reference for information and comment on a range of foreign and Chinese activities. Regularly it also features translations of Chinese official notifications and news. The Herald had correspondents across the whole of China. These supplied a constant stream of news on an extensive range of topics, as well as news and gossip, such as, -- apart from news and gossip reflecting the social, cultural and political life of the foreign settlements--, trade statistics, stock prices, Chinese news, essays on Chinese culture and language, law reports from foreign courts in the settlements, company reports, news on foreign social, cultural and political life, maps, cartoons, photographs, stock prices and law and company reports, advertisements, tables of tea, silk and cotton exports, or long-forgotten facts about missionaries, birth, marriage, and death announcements. Its coverage extends well beyond British communities, and includes other foreign nationals - the French, Danish, Italian, German, Dutch…, etc., etc. Although a thriving treaty port press developed over the century of the foreign presence, no other newspaper existed over such an extended period, and covers it in such incredible depth and variety. The dense unindexed columns of the Herald offer therefore an indispensable, still largely unexplored treasure-trove for any scholar of modern Chinese history. War, revolution and politics have conspired to destroy library holdings or frustrate access to publications from China’s treaty century. The fully text-searchable North China Herald Online will be one of the primary resources on a period which continues to shape much of China’s world and worldview.
The Chinese Students’ Monthly is the first magazine published by Chinese students in the United States from 1906-1931. This publication became the official organ of the enlarged Chinese student organization: The Chinese Students’ Alliance in the U.S. Many important historical figures among Chinese students in the U.S. during the early 20th century, such as Sao-Ke Alfred Sze, Wellington Koo, Hu Shi, Chao Yuanren, Xie Bingxin, contributed their articles to this magazine. The magazine was a most influential publication among the Chinese students in the U.S. at that time. The overseas Chinese has been an emerging area of scholarly research. This magazine includes valuable information for scholars in this particular field. During its publication, the periodical discussed important movements in China during that period of time: education, social, industrial, agricultural, political, and economical, etc. In addition, the period (1906-1931) during which the magazine was published happened to be an important turning period for modern Chinese history. The Chinese Students' Monthly Online, a full-text searchable online product, makes this primary source available to scholars and interested readers on modern China.
This online product is a result of collaboration between Cornell University Library and Brill. It is, to the best of our knowledge, the most comprehensive collection of the magazine so far. This online collection of The Chinese Students’ Monthly includes 25 volumes from Volume 2 to Volume 26 as we have not found any reference on Volume 1. In addition, we were not able to get a copy of Issue 8 in Volume 12, Issues 3, 4, 5 and 6 in Volume 17, Issues 7 and 8 in Volume 25 and Issues 2, 3, 4, 7, and 8 in Volume 26. If any individual or library has a copy of any of these issues, either on paper or microfilm or any format, please let us know so that we could make this collection more complete.
Brill’s Encyclopedia of China Online is based on the originally a thousand-page reference work on China with a clear focus on the modern period from the mid-nineteenth century to the 21st century. Written by the world’s top scholars, Brill’s Encyclopedia of China Online is the first place to look for reliable information on the history, geography, society, economy, politics, science, and culture of China. Originally published and warmly received in German (edited by the GIGA Institute of Asian Studies in Hamburg, published by WBG, Darmstadt, 2003), Brill’s Encyclopedia of China Online will serve both English-language students and faculty in conveniently providing a wealth of reliable and solid information on China.
Brill’s Encyclopedia of China Online was also published in print (ISBN 978-90-04-16863-3, Out of print).

Features and Benefits:
- Approx. 450 in-depth articles and approx. 850,000 words
- More than 100 black and white and full color illustrations, full color maps, and tables
- Bibliographies for further reading accompanying each article
- Extensive glossary of Chinese personal names
- Extensive indices
• Dates: (inclusive): 1946-1985 • Languages used: Chinese • EAD finding aids are available Produced mostly by the Central Newsreel and Documentary Film Studio of China, documentary films and newsreels were two of the major mass media and communication channels in China from the 1950’s through the 1970’s. They covered all aspects of social activities, though the emphasis was on developments and achievements in the building of a socialist country. In order to reach even broader public audiences, government agents produced and printed the transcripts and shot lists for the films and sent them to cities and rural areas. The bulk of the items in the collection are transcripts for the documentary films and newsreels from the Cultural Revolution, 1966-1976. Few of these printed materials have survived due to the poor quality of the paper upon which they were printed. All documents in the collection are in Chinese. Location of originals: Duke University Library, Durham
Open Access: Chinese Iconography Thesaurus

The Chinese Iconography Thesaurus (CIT) is freely accessible and brings together sinology, art history and information studies to create the first alternative classification scheme, especially designed for the Chinese visual culture, with a complementary image archive. Traditionally iconography has been used to index and access images of European art. Because of the lack of alternative models, the contents of non-Western art objects have long been catalogued according to Eurocentric classifications. To fill this gap, a research group led by Hongxing Zhang, Senior Curator of Chinese collections at the V&A London, created the CIT.

The CIT website is built and hosted by Brill. The database can be consulted in both Chinese and English and is regularly updated; Currently, it contains 10,000 terms extracted primarily from pre-1900 sources and 2700 images of objects from the V&A, the MET, and the NPM Taipei.
• Number of titles: 654 • Languages used: English, French, Spanish, Italian, Latin, Russian, Dutch, German and Portuguese • Title list and printed guide are available • Location of originals: Library of the School of Oriental and African Studies, London This new online collection comprises a descriptive, annotated bibliography of 654 early Western books on Imperial China up to 1850, all to be found in the Library of the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS), London. The collection is based on the book Western Books on China published up to 1850 by John Lust. The material is of unique historical interest, containing a scrutiny of China by Western societies.. The books, in a variety of Western languages, testify to the formidable difficulties encountered by Westerners, who attempted to extend their own familiar historical, linguistic and religious perceptions to the Chinese context.