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Institutional, Substantive and Comparative EU Aspects
East African Community Law provides a comprehensive and open-access text book on EAC law. Written by leading experts, including the president of the EACJ, national judges, academics and practitioners, it provides the most complete overview to date of this increasingly important field. Uniquely, the book also provides a systematic comparison with EU law. EU companion chapters provide concise overviews of EU law and its development, offering valuable inspiration for the application and further development of EAC law.

The book has been written for all practitioners, judges, civil servants, academics and students faced with questions of EAC law. It discusses institutional, substantive and jurisdictional issues, including the nature of EAC law, free movement and competition law as well as the reception of EAC law in Partner States.
Missionary Archives - Africa
East Africa

The importance of missionary archives as a primary resource continues to grow as their value for the study of a variety of scholarly disciplines and subjects becomes ever more widely recognized. This collection lists 19th and 20th century archive materials relating to Africa, south of Sahara, and to Madagascar and Mauritius. There are large sections on Southern, Central and West Africa and lesser amounts on Eastern and Western Central Africa.

This collection is also included in the Missionary Archives - Africa collection.
Missionary Archives - Africa
North-East Africa

The importance of missionary archives as a primary resource continues to grow as their value for the study of a variety of scholarly disciplines and subjects becomes ever more widely recognized. This collection lists 19th and 20th century archive materials relating to Africa, south of Sahara, and to Madagascar and Mauritius. There are large sections on Southern, Central and West Africa and lesser amounts on Eastern and Western Central Africa.

This collection is also included in the Missionary Archives - Africa collection.
Missionary Archives - Africa
South-East Africa

The importance of missionary archives as a primary resource continues to grow as their value for the study of a variety of scholarly disciplines and subjects becomes ever more widely recognized. This collection lists 19th and 20th century archive materials relating to Africa, south of Sahara, and to Madagascar and Mauritius. There are large sections on Southern, Central and West Africa and lesser amounts on Eastern and Western Central Africa.

This collection is also included in the Missionary Archives - Africa collection.
This book examines the existing counter-terrorism laws and practices in the six-member East African Community (EAC) as it applies to a range of law enforcement and military activities under various international legal obligations. Dr. Christopher E. Bailey provides a comparative examination of existing national law for EAC countries, including compliance with obligations under international human rights and international humanitarian law, and offers a range of legal reform recommendations. This book addresses two primary, related research questions: To what extent do the current national counter-terrorism laws and practices of the EAC Partner States comply with existing international human rights safeguards? What laws or practices can the EAC adopt to achieve better compliance with human rights safeguards in both civilian and military counter-terrorism operations?
Three-Terminal Cultural Corridor in the Western Indian Ocean (1799-1856)
Winner of the Society for Arabian Studies Grant in 2003. This study examines a view '‘from outside’ of the three terminals: Makran, Muscat and Zanzibar which is a partial one in the history of the western Indian Ocean. Such themes are, however, essential when viewed against the background of Anglo-French rivalry in the Gulf and Indian Ocean during the first half of the nineteenth century, and are central to numerous debates. The methodological perspective, therefore, whilst concerned with oriental figures and events, is still largely based on sources in western languages precisely because it concentrates on the relations between Saʾ īd bin Sulṭān Āl Bū Saʾ īdī (r. 1806-1856), the Arab-Omani sovereign of Muscat and Zanzibar, and Europe, and on Baluch presence in Oman and in East Africa.
The Relationship of the Social, Material, and Perceptual
The authors of this inter-disciplinary collection examine the role of space in six areas of West, Central and East Africa during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. They demonstrate the active quality of space and analyze the ways in which people have contested and shaped space, including responses to crises. In addition, a lengthy essay re-interprets tropical African history, 1800-1930, using spatial theory. Contributors look at how people have constructed mental maps, used discourse to organize territories, and perceived social landscapes. The studies employ a tri-level approach, one that moves from specific places to regions to macro-regional or transnational systems and back again. Authors draw upon written and oral sources to reconstruct the past and employ innovative mapping techniques to illustrate spatial dynamics.
Letters from a Danish Planter in German East Africa 1888-1906
This book provides a rare opportunity to follow the daily life on and around plantations and towns in the first years of the German colonial presence in East Africa, as seen through the eyes of a Danish master farmer working for the German East Africa Company. There are few memoirs and personal letters from these years, and existent letters are primarily by explorers, colonial officials, missionaries or the occasional settler. Lautherborn's material provides one of the very few entry points into the daily business of colonial expansion and consolidation in the early years of German East Africa as seen through the eyes of a practical man trying to do a job in a complex and changing world.
Three East African Arabic Historical Documents
This work consists of the translation and annotation of three East African Arabic / Swahili manuscripts together with the original texts. They cover aspects of the history of the coast from the early Himyaritic period up to the beginning of the 20th century. By the use of earlier, in some cases hitherto unused Arabic sources, the authors of the texts have contributed to a fuller picture of the East African coastal history. The texts relate directly to works on East African coastal history that have appeared since the latter part of the 19th century. They are presented against the background of general Arabic and Islamic history. The annotations indicate, and some case stress, significant hints and references to matters that need to be borne in mind, along with archeological and other evidences.
East Africa as a Literary and Linguistic Contact Zone
This wide-ranging collection deals with the dynamics of current developments in literature, language, and culture in Kenya and Tanzania. It testifies to a spirited exchange of ideas between writers and academics and promotes transdisciplinary dialogue among several academic fields – anglophone and Swahili studies, literary studies and linguistics, East African and German academic discourse, Kenyan and Tanzanian perspectives. The contributions create a ‘contact zone’ of their own that will generate productive impulses for transdisciplinary research and allow readers to gain new insights into trajectories of Swahili and anglophone writing in East Africa.
Topics covered include literary language choice and translation, popular fiction and codeswitching, Swahili hip-hop texts, HIV/AIDS discourse, the advance of ‘Sheng’ and ‘Engsh’ in literary-linguistic space, contemporary women’s literature in Kenya, and special studies of Abdulrazak Gurnah and David G. Maillu.

CONTRIBUTORS
MIKHAIL D. GROMOV • ABDULRAZAK GURNAH • SISSY HELFF • LILLIAN KAVITI • EUPHRASE KEZILAHABI • SAID A.M. KHAMIS • ALDIN K. MUTEMBEI • YVONNE ADHIAMBO OWUOR • UTA REUSTER–JAHN • ALINA N. RINKANYA • GABRIEL RUHUMBIKA • CLARISSA VIERKE • KYALLO WADI WAMITILA