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mujallad-i avval daftar-i avval u duvum
The founder of the Mawlawiyya order of dervishes, Jalāl al-Dīn Rūmī (d. 672/1273) is the most celebrated and widely quoted mystical poet of the Persianate world. Born in Balkh in 604/1207, he was still a child when his father, a preacher, emigrated westwards with his family, moving to Malaṭya, Sivas, Akshehir, Larende and, finally, Konya. It was in Konya that Rūmī, who had also received a regular education, met the people who would give his life a decisive turn towards mysticism: first, his father’s former pupil Sayyid Burhān al-Dīn Muḥaqqiq (d. 637/1239-40) and then, most of all, the celebrated mystic Shams al-Dīn Tabrīzī (d. 645/1247). Rūmī’s Mathnawi-yi maʿnawī is a didactic poem inspired by his favourite student Ḥusām al-Dīn Čelebi (d. 683/1284). Composed in six fascicles ( daftar), it took several years to complete. The edition printed here is an enhanced version of the one by Nicholson, with Nicholson’s introductory essays and notes translated into Persian. 4 vols; volume 1.
mujallad-i duvum daftar-i sivum u chahārum
The founder of the Mawlawiyya order of dervishes, Jalāl al-Dīn Rūmī (d. 672/1273) is the most celebrated and widely quoted mystical poet of the Persianate world. Born in Balkh in 604/1207, he was still a child when his father, a preacher, emigrated westwards with his family, moving to Malaṭya, Sivas, Akshehir, Larende and, finally, Konya. It was in Konya that Rūmī, who had also received a regular education, met the people who would give his life a decisive turn towards mysticism: first, his father’s former pupil Sayyid Burhān al-Dīn Muḥaqqiq (d. 637/1239-40) and then, most of all, the celebrated mystic Shams al-Dīn Tabrīzī (d. 645/1247). Rūmī’s Mathnawi-yi maʿnawī is a didactic poem inspired by his favourite student Ḥusām al-Dīn Čelebi (d. 683/1284). Composed in six fascicles ( daftar), it took several years to complete. The edition printed here is an enhanced version of the one by Nicholson, with Nicholson’s introductory essays and notes translated into Persian. 4 vols; volume 2.
mujallad-i sivum daftar-i panjum u shishum
The founder of the Mawlawiyya order of dervishes, Jalāl al-Dīn Rūmī (d. 672/1273) is the most celebrated and widely quoted mystical poet of the Persianate world. Born in Balkh in 604/1207, he was still a child when his father, a preacher, emigrated westwards with his family, moving to Malaṭya, Sivas, Akshehir, Larende and, finally, Konya. It was in Konya that Rūmī, who had also received a regular education, met the people who would give his life a decisive turn towards mysticism: first, his father’s former pupil Sayyid Burhān al-Dīn Muḥaqqiq (d. 637/1239-40) and then, most of all, the celebrated mystic Shams al-Dīn Tabrīzī (d. 645/1247). Rūmī’s Mathnawi-yi maʿnawī is a didactic poem inspired by his favourite student Ḥusām al-Dīn Čelebi (d. 683/1284). Composed in six fascicles ( daftar), it took several years to complete. The edition printed here is an enhanced version of the one by Nicholson, with Nicholson’s introductory essays and notes translated into Persian. 4 vols; volume 3.
mujallad-i chahārum kashf al-abyāt va namāyahā
The founder of the Mawlawiyya order of dervishes, Jalāl al-Dīn Rūmī (d. 672/1273) is the most celebrated and widely quoted mystical poet of the Persianate world. Born in Balkh in 604/1207, he was still a child when his father, a preacher, emigrated westwards with his family, moving to Malaṭya, Sivas, Akshehir, Larende and, finally, Konya. It was in Konya that Rūmī, who had also received a regular education, met the people who would give his life a decisive turn towards mysticism: first, his father’s former pupil Sayyid Burhān al-Dīn Muḥaqqiq (d. 637/1239-40) and then, most of all, the celebrated mystic Shams al-Dīn Tabrīzī (d. 645/1247). Rūmī’s Mathnawi-yi maʿnawī is a didactic poem inspired by his favourite student Ḥusām al-Dīn Čelebi (d. 683/1284). Composed in six fascicles ( daftar), it took several years to complete. The edition printed here is an enhanced version of the one by Nicholson, with Nicholson’s introductory essays and notes translated into Persian. 4 vols; volume 4.
This volume is a collection of essays on classical Persian literature, focusing on Persian rhetorical devices, especially imagery and metaphors. The various contributions discuss the origin and the development of debate poetry, the transmission of Persian and Arabic tales to the works of Europeans medieval authors such as Boccaccio and Chaucer, but also the development of Aristotelian poetics and epistemology in Persian philosophical tradition. Furthermore, the baroque style of the Shiʿite author Ḥusayn Vāʾiẓ Kāshifī, the use of wine metaphors by mystics such as Jalāl al-Dīn Rūmī, Ḥāfiẓ’s original use of candle metaphors, the translation of Khayyām’s metaphors into English, and the importance of a single metaphor in the epic Barzū-nāma are discussed.

Contributors include: F. Abdullaeva, G.R. van den Berg, J. Landau, F.D. Lewis, N. Pourjavady, Ch. van Ruymbeke, A. Sedighi and S. Sharma
Jalāl al-Dīn Rūmī (Mawlānā) is the most famous and widely quoted mystical poet of the Persiate world. Ever since he passed away in 672/1273, people have studied, commented and recited his works, both in the Muslim world and, in modern times, also in the West. After Firīdūn Aḥmad Sipahsālār’s (d. before 712/1312) Risāla-yi Sipahsālār dar manāqib-i khudāwandigār, the second most detailed source on Rūmī in Persian is Shams al-Dīn Aḥmad Aflākī ʿĀrifī’s (d. 761/1360) Manāqib al-ʿārifīn. A follower of Rūmī’s grandson Jalāl al-Dīn Firīdūn (d. 719/1320), Aflākī could include a lot of first-hand information in his work. Aflākī’s work saw at least two revised editions: the Khulāṣat al-Manāqib by Aḥmad b. Maḥmūd (early 9th/15th century), and the work published here by ʿAbd al-Wahhāb b. Jalāl al-Dīn Hamadānī (d. 954/1547). Composed in Egypt where he had sought refuge from Safavid anti-Sunnī policies, he abridged the original text, removing mistakes and redundant, inappropriate, and un-Persian, ‘alien’ material.
The Mawlana Rumi Review is an academic journal (est. 2010) devoted to the poetry, life, thought, and legacy of Jalal al-Din Rumi (d. 1273), the Islamic Sufi poet who authored some 60,000 lines of poetry, lectures, sermons, and letters in Persian and Arabic, and who founded the Mevlevi (Mawlawiyya) dervish order. The journal publishes original articles, translations of Rumi’s poetry done from the original language, book reviews, and reports. The editors welcome articles in English, as well as in French, Persian and Turkish, on the following topics: Historical biography of Rumi and his circle, based on original sources; analysis and interpretation of Rumi’s poetry; his adaptation of the literary and Sufi traditions; his narratology and story-telling techniques; hermeneutics; theology and prophetology; theosophy and mysticism; spiritual psychology; erotic spirituality; metaphysics and cosmology; epistemology; ethics; pedagogy; the history of the Mevlevi order; the commentary and interpretative tradition on his works (The Masnavī, Dīvān-i Shams-i Tabrīz, Fīhi mā fīh and Majālis al-sabʽa ; and the reception and translation of Rumi’s thought in modern and medieval literary history and thought.

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In Persian literature, so-called ‘ majālis’ works typically evoke the atmosphere of a religious gathering. In such a gathering, a chronicler relates parts of the history of Islam and the lives and times of its prominent representatives, often referring to trustworthy sources. Besides, questions may be asked, while teachings or sermons may also be given. Examples are Jalāl al-Dīn Rūmī’s (d. 672/1273) Majālis-i sabʿa and Saʿdī’s (d. 691/1292) Majālis-i panj-gānah. Judging by its title, the present work by an unknown author from the 5th/12th century—it is not known if it was originally written in Persian or translated from Arabic—would seem to belong to this same type of writings. Only, on closer inspection this is not the case. Being mostly inspired by Ibn Isḥāq’s (d. 150/767) al-Sīra al-nabawiyya and Abū Ḥātim al-Rāzī’s (d. 322/933-4) Aʿlām al-nubuwwa, only its last five chapters are called majlis, but then lack the characteristics of a typical majālis work.
This is the first systematic examination of the esoteric significance of the bawdy tales and explicit sexual passages present in Rūmī’s (d. 1273) Mathnawī, a masterpiece of medieval Perso-Islamic mystical literature and theosophic teachings. Using the relevant features of postmodern theories as strategic conceptual tools, and drawing on the recent interpretations of medieval kabbalistic texts, it is a fascinating examination of the link between the dynamics of eroticism and esotericism operative in Rūmī’s Mathnawī. In some of these bawdy tales, the phallus is used as an esoteric symbol. The book concludes that these tales are used primarily to communicate esoteric secrets, particularly when this communication is contemplated along gender lines, mediated through erotic imagery, or expressed in sexual terms.