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In Violence: Probing the Boundaries around the World the contributors analyse implicitly and explicitly the conceptualisation of violent processes across the world, as well as the circumstances that enable them to exist, and open ways to imagine valuable interventions. This collection of articles presented on the 11th Global Conference in Prague makes clear how fascinating violence is, and how difficult to cope with and to initiate changes. Through explicit thinking, the book opens ways to develop and to plan relevant initiatives and valuable interventions that are culture sensitive.
Editors: David Rood and John Boyle
Robert L. Rankin was a seminal figure in late 20th and early 21st centuries in the field of Siouan linguistics. His knowledge, like the papers he produced, was voluminous. We have gathered here a representation of his work that spans over thirty years. The papers presented here focus on both the languages Rankin studied in depth (Quapaw, Kansa, Biloxi, Ofo, and Tutelo) and comparative historical work on the Siouan language family in general. While many of the papers included have been previously published, one third of them have never before been made public including a grammatical sketch and dictionary of Ofo and his final paper on the place of Mandan in the larger Siouan family.
Dalir and the Eyjafjörður region c.870-c.1265
Author: Chris Callow
Chris Callow’s Landscape, Tradition and Power critically examines the evidence for socio-political developments in medieval Iceland during the so-called Commonwealth period. The book compares regions in the west and north-east of Iceland because these regions had differing human and physical geographies, and contrasting levels of surviving written evidence. Callow sets out the likely economies and institutional frameworks in which political action took place. He then examines different forms of evidence – the Contemporary sagas, Landnámabók (The Book of Settlements), and Sagas of Icelanders – considering how each describes different periods of the Commonwealth present political power. Among its conclusions the book emphasises stasis over change and the need to appreciate the nuances and purposes of Iceland’s historicising sagas.
Crossroads of Cuisine provides a history of foods, and foodways in terms of exchanges taking place in Central Asia and in surrounding areas such as China, Korea or Iran during the last 5000 years, stressing the manner in which East and West, West and East grew together through food. It provides a discussion of geographical foundations, and an interlocking historical and cultural overview going down to the present day, with a comparative country by country survey of foods and recipes. An ethnographic photo essay embracing all parts of the book binds it all together, and helps make topics discussed vivid and approachable. The book is important for explaining key relationships that have not always been made clear in past scholarship.
Nordic Inheritance Law through the Ages – Spaces of Action and Legal Strategies explores the significance of inheritance law from medieval times to the present through topical and in-depth studies that bring life to historical and contemporary inheritance practices. The contributions cover three themes: status of persons and options in the process of property devolution; wills, gift-giving and legal disputes as means to shape the working of the law; processes of inheritance legislation.

The authors focus on instances where legal strategies of various actors particularly reveal inheritance law as a contested and yet constrained space of action, and somewhat surprisingly show similar solutions to family law issues dealt with in other Western European countries.

Contributors are: Simone Abram, Gitte Meldgaard Abrahamsen, Per Andersen, Agnes S. Arnórsdóttir, John Asland, Knut Dørum, Thomas Eeg, Ian Peter Grohse, Marianne Holdgaard, Astrid Mellem Johnsen, Már Jónsson, Mia Korpiola, Gabriela Bjarne Larsson, Auður Magnúsdóttir, Bodil Selmer, Helle I. M. Sigh, and Miriam Tveit.
Author: Renzo S. Duin
Thanks to Renzo Duin’s annotated translation, the voice of Lodewijk Schmidt—an Afrodiasporic Saramakka Maroon from Surinam—is finally available for Anglophone audiences worldwide. More than anything else, Schmidt’s three mid-twentieth-century ethnographic accounts tell the tragic story of Indigenous Peoples of the Eastern Guiana Highlands (northern Brazil, and southern Suriname and French Guiana). Schmidt’s is a story that takes account of the pathological mechanisms of colonialism, in which Indigenous Peoples and African Diaspora communities, both victims of colonialism, vilify each other falling privy to the divide-and-conquer mentality mechanisms of colonialism.

Accounts like that of the death and mourning of a magnificent Indigenous leader, Alapité, on 13-14 August 1941, suggest a deep respect on the part of the Maroon author, while his accounts also show his awareness of how the Indigenous Peoples vilified the Maroons. Beyond the ethnographic element, Duin argues that Schmidt was sent on a covert mission to determine whether or not the Nazis had engaged in covert missions and if they had established bases and airfields in the region.

As current ecological disasters, incurred by neocolonial, neoliberal and geopolitical practices, threaten to completely destroy the Amazonian forests that Schmidt describes, his meticulous accounts underscore the predetermined tragedy that is the result of the European and later North-American presence in present-day Suriname, French Guiana and Brazil. Duin’s profound knowledge of the history, topography, and fauna of the region contextualizes Schmidt’s ethnographic accounts and forces us to take account of the catastrophe that is deforestation and ethnocide of the Indigenous Peoples of the Eastern Guiana Highlands.
The EU is to-day at a crossroad: either it becomes a great supranational union or it goes back to being an array of separate independent states. Alberto Martinelli and Alessandro Cavalli draw a grand fresco of the society in which the European Union is taking shape. Long term social and cultural trends and main current developments in economics and politics are synthetically outlined. Key questions of identity and nationalism, immigration and inequality, welfare and economic governance, are thoroughly analysed. Main cleavages, conflicts of interest and different visions of member states, as well as institutional reforms and crisis management strategies are critically discussed. A detailed proposal for advancing the process of political integration concludes the volume.
Author: Ash Watson
Taylah Brown is happy. She is. She has graduated university and she is in love and Sydney is a wonderful city to be in love in – all sunshine and blue water everywhere. It’s 2014 and the future is paved out in front her, a heat shimmer of possibility. Haircuts. Concerts. Holidays. Birthdays. Getting engaged, being engaged, going to brunch to show off the ring. More birthdays, a promotion, finding the right white dress. Getting married, going on her honeymoon, buying a house, having a child, getting a dog, going to the gym, moving house, camping at beach, weekends spent baking in the kitchen. New haircuts, new jobs, more birthdays, more birthdays… Choice-laden, picturesque, this is the good life. Isn’t it?

Into the Sea is a novel about ‘the Australian way of life’, grounded in ethnographic research, and crafted to engage readers in sociological imagination. A glocal frame sees contemporary cultural tensions play out through the panoramic dimensions of relationships and life events. Designed with layers and levels of reading, this novel will appeal to contemporary fiction readers and makes a lively addition to undergraduate and graduate curriculum across sociology, cultural studies, gender studies, arts-based research, and contemporary literature.
In 2018, 24% of first-time graduate school enrollments were members of minoritized populations, while attrition rates continue to signal a blocked pathway to doctoral degree and assistant professorship attainment. How We Got Here: The Role of Critical Mentoring and Social Justice Praxis. Essays in Honor of George W. Noblit is a collective effort of scholars of education to deploy critical mentoring and social justice praxis to disrupt this pattern of institutional failure. Critical mentoring rejects meritocratic discourses that deny the politicized, racialized, gendered, and ableist spaces of higher education. Social justice praxis centers the knowledge and struggle of doctoral students with multiple intersectional identities as interdisciplinary bodies of praxis. These positionings speak back to institutional -isms with the aim of broadening the participation of folx conventionally held in the margins of academia.

This volume is presented as a definitive collection that holistically honors nearly 40 years of critical mentoring and social justice praxis with George W. Noblit, which each contributor has carried into their own work.

Contributors are: Silvia Cristina Bettez, Heather Bower, Ashley S. Boyd, Mary Kay Delaney, Josh Diem, Deborah Eaker-Rich, Courtney George, Beth Hatt, Sherick Hughes, Rhonda Jeffries, Michael E. Jennings, Alison LaGarry, Monica McKinney, Jason Mendez, Hillary Parkhouse, Summer Melody Pennell, Marta Sanchéz, M. Billye Sankofa Waters, Amy Senta, Amy Swain, and Luis Urrieta, Jr.