Author: Nobuto Yamamoto
In Censorship in Colonial Indonesia, 1901–1942 Nobuto Yamamoto examines the institutionalization of censorship and its symbiosis with print culture in the Netherlands Indies. Born from the liberal desire to promote the well-being of the colonial population, censorship was not practiced exclusively in repressive ways but manifested in constructive policies and stimuli, among which was the cultivation of the “native press” under state patronage. Censorship in the Indies oscillated between liberal impulse and the intrinsic insecurity of a colonial state in the era of nationalism and democratic governance. It proved unpredictable in terms of outcomes, at times being co-opted by resourceful activists and journalists, and susceptible to international politics as it transformed during the Sino-Japanese war of the 1930s.
Text Dating by Machine Learning
Editors: Gregory Toner and Xiwu Han
In Language and Chronology, Toner and Han apply innovative Machine Learning techniques to the problem of the dating of literary texts. Many ancient and medieval literatures lack reliable chronologies which could aid scholars in locating texts in their historical context. The new machine-learning method presented here uses chronological information gleaned from annalistic records to date a wide range of texts. The method is also applied to multi-layered texts to aid the identification of different chronological strata within single copies.
While the algorithm is here applied to medieval Irish material of the period c.700-c.1700, it can be extended to written texts in any language or alphabet. The authors’ approach presents a step change in Digital Humanities, moving us beyond simple querying of electronic texts towards the production of a sophisticated tool for literary and historical studies.
New Perspectives on Composition, Dating, and Authorship
Edited by Michael Hunter and Martin Kern and featuring contributions by preeminent scholars of early China, Confucius and the Analects Revisited: New Perspectives on Composition, Dating, and Authorship critically examines the long-standing debates surrounding the history of the Analects, for two millennia considered the most authoritative source of the teachings of Confucius (551–479 BCE). Unlike most previous scholarship, it does not take the traditional view of the Analects’ origins as given. Instead, it explores the validity and the implications of recent revisionist critiques from historical, philosophical, and literary perspectives, and further draws on recently discovered ancient manuscripts and new technological advances in the Digital Humanities. As such, it opens up new ways for productive engagement with the text.
Contributors: Mark Csikszentmihalyi, Paul van Els, Robert Eno, Joachim Gentz, Paul R. Goldin, Michael Hunter, Martin Kern, Esther Klein, John Makeham, Matthias L. Richter.
Travelling Chronicles presents fourteen episodes in the history of news, written by some of the leading scholars in the rapidly developing fields of news and newspaper studies. Ranging across eastern and western Europe and beyond, the chapters look back to the early modern period and into the eighteenth century to consider how the news of the past was gathered and spread, how news outlets gained respect and influence, how news functioned as a business, and also how the historiography of news can be conducted with the resources available to scholars today. Travelling Chronicles offers a timely analysis of early news, at a moment when historical newspaper archives are being widely digitalised and as the truth value of news in our own time undergoes intense scrutiny.
In Tibetan Printing: Comparisons, Continuities and Change the editors publish the results of the workshop “Printing as an Agent of Change in Tibet and beyond” held at Pembroke College, Cambridge, in November 2013. This is the first study of the social and cultural history of Tibetan book technology that takes materials, living traditions and cross-cultural comparisons into consideration. Bringing together leading experts from different disciplines, it discusses the introduction of printing in Tibetan societies in the context of Asian book cultures with an eye to the questions raised by the study of the European history of printing. This title is available online in its entirety in Open Access.
Contributors are: Tim Barrett, Alessandro Boesi, Peter Burke, Michela Clemente, Hildegard Diemberger, Dorje Gyeltsen, Franz-Karl Ehrhard, Helmut Eimer, Johan Elverskog, Camillo Formigatti, Imre Galambos, Agnieszka Helman-Wazny, Tomasz Wazny, Sherab Sangpo Kawa, Peter Kornicki, Leonard van der Kuijp, Stefan Larsson, Ben Nourse, Anuradha Pallipurath, Porong Dawa, Paola Ricciardi, Tsering Dawa Sharshon, Sam van Schaik, Cristina Scherrer-Schaub, Marta Sernesi, Pasang Wangdu.
Editor: Angus Phillips
Logos – the international journal of the publishing community – celebrates its 25th anniversary in 2015. Since its first publication it has gained a reputation for publishing insightful and clear-headed articles about publishing, and this tradition continues to the present day, with the addition in recent years of academic articles reflecting the growth in the discipline of publishing studies.

The present collection provides the opportunity to mark this milestone in the journal’s history by reprinting over thirty articles in book form. The selection has been made with a view to representing the full span of the life of the journal, with a good spread across the years of publication from 1990 onwards. The articles selected are ones that have stood the test of time and have something interesting to say. There is broad international coverage, from Argentina to China, from Iran to Kenya, and a wide selection of topics including publishing, bookselling, libraries, censorship, and book history. The new introduction, written by the journal’s editor-in-chief, Angus Phillips, places the articles in perspective, highlighting their currency and foresight.

The volume will be essential reading for both industry professionals and students of book history and publishing studies.

Featured articles are by Maarten Aascher, Marc Aronson, Diana Athill, Betty Ballantine, Michael Bhaskar, Marie-Franҫoise Cachin and Sylvie Ducas-Spaes, Henry Chakava, John Curtis, Tomás Eloy Martínez, Joseph J. Esposito, Richard Fisher, Gordon Graham, Arash Hejazi, Eva Hemmungs Wirtén, Albert Henderson, Philip Jarvis and Sue Thomson, Eva Kneissl, Miha Kovač and Rüdiger Wischenbart, Michael Krüger, Laura J. Miller, Ian Norrie, Angus Phillips, Frances Pinter, Oliviero Ponte di Pino, Tatjana Praštalo, Tim Rix, Tom Rosenthal, Jerome Rubin, John Ryden, Tim Waterstone, and Francis Whitehead.

Author: Young Kyun Oh
In Engraving Virtue, Young Kyun Oh investigates the publishing history of the Samgang Haengsil-to (Illustrated Guide to the Three Relations), a moral primer of Chosŏn (1392–1910), and traces the ways in which woodblock printed books contributed to shaping premodern Korea.
Originally conceived by the court as a book with which to instill in its society Confucian ethics encased in the stories of moral heroes and heroines as filial sons, loyal subjects, and devoted wives, the Samgang Haengsil-to embodies various aspects of Chosŏn society. With careful examinations of its various editions and historical documents, Oh presents how the life of this book reflected the complicated factors of the Chosŏn society and how it became more than just a reading material.
Mostly remembered for his library and for his biblical criticism, Isaac Vossius (1618-1689) played a central role in the early modern European world of learning. Taking his cue from the unlikely bedfellows Joseph Scaliger and René Descartes, Vossius published on chronology, biblical criticism, optics, African geography and Chinese civilization, while collecting, annotating and selling one of the century’s most precious libraries. He was appointed an early Fellow of the Royal Society, and moved in the circles which later gave rise to the Académie Royale des Sciences. Together with Christiaan Huygens, he was considered the Dutch Republic’s foremost student of nature.
In this volume, a range of authors analyse Vossius’ participation in the full spectrum of the Republic of Letters, much of which has sadly been written out of the history of both scholarship and science.

Contributors include: Anthony Grafton, Scott Mandelbrote, Fokko Jan Dijksterhuis, Karel Davids, Thijs Weststeijn, Colette Nativel, Susan Derksen and Astrid C. Balsem
Early Western Books, 1500-1599
The Ottoman empire and the Mediterranean

Titles from the collection of the School of Oriental and African Studies, London. A majority of the titles concern the history of the Eastern Mediterranean and relations between the European Christians and the Ottoman Turks, including a number of works inspired by the naval Battle of Lepanto in 1571. Other topics include the East Indies and China, South America, a Japanese embassy to Rome and the history of several Italian cities. Also includes treatises and grammars by humanist scholars, such as Guillaume Postel.
Western Books on China Published up to 1850

A collection of 654 books on microfiche based on the impressive bibliography by John Lust of all early western books on China to be found in the library of the SOAS.

As John Lust says in his introduction to his book Western Books on China published up to 1850, the material in this collection is becoming harder to find the further the period in which it was produced recedes from us. This literature covers the first great period of Western contact with China, and ranges from accounts by medieval travellers and delegations to the first stages of the European attempts to bring China into the world market and to gain, if necessary by force, a foothold in the south and ultimately in the capital.
The material contains, in the first place, an abundance of observations and hearsay, running the gamut from the valuable and the credible to sheer fantasy and invention. The enthusiastic exaggerations of foreign visitors often have to be tempered by comparison with sober reports in Chinese sources, such as local gazetteers and memoires.
Secondly, there is material testifying to the formidable difficulties encountered by Westerners attempting to impose on Chinese matters their own familiar historical, linguistic, religious, and other categories, which themselves were undergoing transformations in this period.
Thirdly, there is the material arising from the activities of Westerners in direct contact with China, the embassies and so on, and by the unofficial intermediaries between China and the West, the traders and missionaries. This group has much in common with the second one, because a great deal of the interpretation of China is even more important as an interpretation of the Western scene itself. A striking general example of this kind of case is the remarkable shift in attitude to China that occurred in the 1830s and 1840s. In many items in this collection, one can observe the notions of benevolent and philosophical despotism and the illusory idylls of eighteenth century Chinoiserie being replaced by contempt for things Chinese and by strident attitudes of superiority in military, ethical, political, and other respects.

John Lust
Van Gulik Collection
Chinese books: Folk Novels
The Van Gulik collection of Chinese books includes three groups. The first group contains a total of 117 titles, including almost all rare folk novels. The second group, including about 132 titles, are mainly books on literature, painting, calligraphy, and history. The third group has 53 music books for the ancient Chinese musical instrument, the ku-ch'in.

This collection is also included in the Van Gulik Collection collection.
Van Gulik Collection
Chinese books: Literature and Fine Arts
The Van Gulik collection of Chinese books includes three groups. The first group contains a total of 117 titles, including almost all rare folk novels. The second group, including about 132 titles, are mainly books on literature, painting, calligraphy, and history. The third group has 53 music books for the ancient Chinese musical instrument, the ku-ch'in.

This collection is also included in the Van Gulik Collection collection.
Van Gulik Collection
Chinese books: Music Scores and Music Books
The Van Gulik collection of Chinese books includes three groups. The first group contains a total of 117 titles, including almost all rare folk novels. The second group, including about 132 titles, are mainly books on literature, painting, calligraphy, and history. The third group has 53 music books for the ancient Chinese musical instrument, the ku-ch'in.

This collection is also included in the Van Gulik Collection collection.