Editor: Paulos Z. Huang
The Yearbook of Chinese Theology is an international, ecumenical and fully peer-reviewed annual that covers Chinese Christianity in the areas of Biblical Studies, Church History, Systematic Theology, Practical Theology, and Comparative Religions. It offers genuine Chinese theological research previously unavailable in English, by top scholars in the study of Christianity in China.

The 2020 volume highlights the five-disciplines of Sino-Western Studies and its guest editor is Thomas Qinghe Xiao. Further contributors are: Paulos Huang, Jianming Chen, Jiangbo Huang, Shangyang Sun and Ding Li, Qiuling Li, Gong Liang, Grace Hui Liang, Anwu Lin, Chunjie Lin, Fenglin Xu, Hao Yuan and Xuanyi Zhou.
Author: John Usher
The full significance of Cecil Henry Polhill (1860-1938), the wealthy squire of Howbury Hall, is known to few, yet he was one of the founding fathers of the Pentecostal-Charismatic tradition in Britain, and his impact and legacy stretch far beyond British shores to North America, the Far East and elsewhere. In Cecil Polhill: Missionary, Gentleman and Revivalist John Usher comprehensively connects Polhill's early life and former experiences as an Evangelical Anglican missionary in China, a member of the Cambridge Seven, with his time as a pioneer of early Pentecostalism, and in doing so reveals a much more richly contoured and multifaceted picture of the development of early Pentecostalism than previously achieved.
Charles Taylor and Zen Buddhism in the West
In Reimagining Zen in a Secular Age André van der Braak offers an account of the exciting but also problematic encounter between enchanted Japanese Zen Buddhism and secular Western modernity over the past century, using Charles Taylor’s magnum opus A Secular Age as an interpretative lens.

As the tenuous compromises of various forms of “Zen modernism” are breaking down today, new imaginings of Zen are urgently needed that go beyond both a Romantic mystical Zen and a secular “mindfulness” Zen. As a Zen scholar-practitioner, André van der Braak shows that the Zen philosophy of the 13th century Zen master Dōgen offers much resources for new hermeneutical, embodied, non-instrumental and communal approaches to contemporary Zen theory and practice in the West.
Contemporary Discussions in Shī ͑ī Legal Theory
In Visions of Sharīʿa Bhojani, De Rooij and Bohlander present the first broad examination of ways in which legal theory ( uṣūl al-fiqh) within Twelver Shīʿī thought continues to be a forum for vibrant debates regarding the assumptions, epistemology and hermeneutics of Sharīʿa in contemporary Shīʿī thought. Bringing together authoritative voices and emerging scholars, from both ‘traditional’ seminaries and ‘Western’ academies, the distinct critical insider and emic accounts provided develop a novel avenue in Islamic legal studies. Contextualised through reference to the history of Shīʿī legal theory as well as contemporary juristic practice and socio-political considerations, the volume demonstrates how one of the most intellectually vibrant and developed discourses of Islamic thought continues to be a key forum for exploring visions of Sharīʿa.
In World History as the History of Foundations, 3000 BCE to 1500 CE, Michael Borgolte investigates the origins and development of foundations from Antiquity to the end of the Middle Ages. In his survey foundations emerge not as mere legal institutions, but rather as “total social phenomena” which touch upon manifold aspects, including politics, the economy, art and religion of the cultures in which they emerged. Cross-cultural in its approach and the result of decades of research, this work represents by far the most comprehensive account of the history of foundations that has hitherto been published.
Religious, Social, and International Perspectives on the Dutch Modernist Movement (1870-1940)
In The Eclipse of Liberal Protestantism in the Netherlands, Tom-Eric Krijger is the first to offer a synthesis of the development of the Protestant modernist movement in Dutch religious, social, cultural, and political life between 1870 and 1940. In historiography, the liberal Protestant community is said to have lost appeal and influence in these decades due to a lack of theological clarity, inner harmony, and organisation. Analysing liberal Protestants’ self-perception vis-à-vis Christian orthodoxy, self-understanding as a faith community, attitude towards other alternatives to orthodoxy, class-consciousness, literary criticism, political commitment, and involvement with foreign mission, Krijger challenges this view. Making an international comparison, he argues that the Dutch modernist movement failed to make headway primarily due to liberal Protestant expectations and discourse.
An Analysis of De trinitate 8-10 in Light of De spiritu et littera
This innovative study makes a fresh contribution to Augustine’s study of grace and the Trinity. Through a close historical-contextual analysis of De trinitate 8-10 and De spiritu et littera, the dissertation demonstrates that a crucial pattern of ‘love rescuing knowledge’ can be seen to be present in both works. Augustine is also shown, in both works, to have a keen interest in discussing the theme of human perfection.In uncovering linkages between Augustine’s reflections on grace and the Trinity in these works, as well as in his other writings, this study makes the wider claim that these two famous theological themes should be explored in concert with one another, rather than be treated separately. The nascent Pelagian controversy is considered as an important historical background, and the dissertation makes use of the most up-to-date scholarship on Platonism and biblical exegesis.
Editor: Paulos Z. Huang
The Yearbook of Chinese Theology is an international, ecumenical and fully peer-reviewed annual that covers Chinese Christianity in the areas of Biblical Studies, Church History, Systematic Theology, Practical Theology, and Comparative Religions. It offers genuine Chinese theological research previously unavailable in English, by top scholars in the study of Christianity in China.

The 2019 volume highlights the five-disciplines of Karl Barth and Sino-Christian theology and its guest editor is Thomas Xutong Qu. Further contributions are from: Paulos Huang and Thomas Xutong Qu, Wai Luen Kwok, Xin Leng, Shi-Min Lu, Quan Li, G. Wright Doyle, Jin Li and Li Ma, Liang Hong, Liang Hong, Shao Kai Tseng, Xiangchen Sun.
Asia Pacific Pentecostalism, edited by Denise A. Austin, Jacqueline Grey, and Paul W. Lewis, yields previously untold stories and interdisciplinary analysis of pioneer foundations, denominational growth, leadership training, contextualisation, and community development across East Asia, Southeast Asia, and Oceania.
Pentecostalism in the Asia Pacific has made an enormous contribution to its global family—from the more visible influence of Yonggi Cho from Korea to the worship revolutions from Australia (particularly associated with Hillsong) and the lesser known missionary activity from Fiji—each region has contributed significantly to global Christianity. Some communities prospered despite hostile environments and wartime devastation. This volume provides a systematic study of the geographical contexts of Asia Pacific Pentecostalism, including historical development, theological influences, and sociological perspectives.

Contributors are: Doreen Alcoran-Benavidez, Dik Allan, Connie Au, Denise A. Austin, Edwardneil Benavidez, John Carter, Michael Chase, Yung Hun Choi, Darin Clements, Shane Clifton, Dynnice Rosanny Engcoy, Michael J. Frost, Luisa J. Gallagher, Sarita D. Gallagher, Kellesi Gore, Adonis Abelard O. Gorospe, Jacqueline Grey, James Hosack, Ken Huff, Paul W. Lewis, Lim Yeu Chuen, Mathew Mathews, Jason Morris, Nyotxay (pseudonym), Saw Tint Sann Oo, Selena Y. Z. Su, Masakazu Suzuki, and Gani Wiyono.
Author: Roland Boer
In Red Theology: On the Christian Communist Tradition, Roland Boer presents key moments in the 2,000 year tradition of Christian communism. Defined by the two features of alternative communal practice and occasional revolutionary action, Christian communism is predicated on profound criticism of the way of the world. The book begins with Karl Kautsky – the leading thinker of second-generation Marxism – and his oft-ignored identification of this tradition. From there, it offers a series of case studies that deal with European instances, the Russian Revolution, and to East Asia. Here we find the emergence of Christian communism not only in China, but also in North Korea. This book will be a vital resource for scholars and students of religion and the many aspects of socialist tradition.
In Missionary Primitivism and Chinese Modernity: the Brethren in Twentieth-Century China, David Woodbridge offers an account of a little-known Protestant missionary group. Often depicted as extreme and marginal, the Brethren were in fact an influential force within modern evangelicalism. They sought to recreate the life of the primitive church, and to replicate the simplicity and dynamism of its missionary work.
Using newly-released archive material, Woodbridge examines the activities of Brethren missionaries in diverse locations across China, from the cosmopolitan treaty ports to the Mongolian and Tibetan frontiers. The book presents a fascinating encounter between primitivist missionaries and a modernising China, and reveals the important role of the Brethren in the development of Chinese Christianity.
Editor: Paulos Z. Huang
The Yearbook of Chinese Theology is an international, ecumenical and fully peer-reviewed annual that covers Chinese Christianity in the areas of Biblical Studies, Church History, Systematic Theology, Practical Theology, and Comparative Religions. It offers genuine Chinese theological research previously unavailable in English, by top scholars in the study of Christianity in China.

The 2018 volume highlights the five-disciplines of Jingjiao theology and its guest editors are Prof. Xiaofeng Tang from China Academy of Social Sciences and Donghua Zhu from Tsinghua University. Further contributions are from: Paulos Huang and Donghua Zhu, David Tam, Chengyong Ge, Daniel Yeung, Melville Stewart, Mar Aprem Metropolitan, Xiaofeng Tang and Yingying Zhang, Fuxue Yang and Wenjing Xue, Donald Wang, Xiaoping Yin, Zhu Li-Layec, Lanping Wang and Qiaosui Zhang.
The Church as Safe Haven conceptualizes the rise of Chinese Christianity as a new civilizational paradigm that encouraged individuals and communities to construct a sacred order for empowerment in modern China. Once Christianity enrooted itself in Chinese society as an indigenous religion, local congregations acquired much autonomy which enabled new religious institutions to take charge of community governance. Our contributors draw on newly-released archival sources, as well as on fieldwork observations investigating what Christianity meant to Chinese believers, how native actors built their churches and faith-based associations within the pre-existing social networks, and how they appropriated Christian resources in response to the fast-changing world. This book reconstructs the narratives of ordinary Christians, and places everyday faith experience at the center.

Contributors are: Christie Chui-Shan Chow, Lydia Gerber, Melissa Inouye, Diana Junio, David Jong Hyuk Kang, Lars Peter Laamann, Joseph Tse-Hei Lee, George Kam Wah Mak, John R. Stanley, R. G. Tiedemann, Man-Shun Yeung.
The Rites Controversies in the Early Modern World is a collection of fourteen articles focusing on debates concerning the nature of “rites” raging in intellectual circles of Europe, Asia and America in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. The controversy started in Jesuit Asian missions where the method of accommodation, based on translation of Christianity into Asian cultural idioms, created a distinction between civic and religious customs. Civic customs were defined as those that could be included into Christianity and permitted to the new converts. However, there was no universal consensus among the various actors in these controversies as to how to establish criteria for distinguishing civility from religion. The controversy had not been resolved, but opened the way to radical religious scepticism.

Contributors are: Claudia Brosseder, Michela Catto, Gita Dharampal-Frick, Pierre Antoine Fabre, Ana Carolina Hosne, Ronnie Po-Chia Hsia, Giuseppe Marcocci, Ovidiu Olar, Sabina Pavone, István Perczel, Nicholas Standaert, Margherita Trento, Guillermo Wilde and Ines G. Županov.