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services at the Azusa Street Revival as including spontaneous *Joseph Byrd is Senior Pastor of the Stewart Road Church of God in Monroe, Michigan. 'For example, see Mickey Crews, The Church of God: A Social History (Knoxville, TN: The University of Tennessee Press, 1990) and Margaret M. Poloma. The

In: Pneuma

in an effort to answer the question that constantly tugged at him, "What happened to the glory of the Azusa Street revival?" Bartleman was not alone in seeking an answer to this question. It was the deep sigh of many of the old timers. "What happened to the glory?" Bartleman's attempt to answer that

In: Pneuma

current theology and missionary practice. 1 Th ree factors will be examined in the light of post-Azusa Pentecostal mission- ary correspondence and historical documents 2 and more recent theology. Since the Azusa Street revival, Pentecost revivals have spurred fresh mis- sionary zeal. For the past century

In: Journal of Pentecostal Theology

Introduction The modern pentecostal movement, birthed at least in part out of the Azusa Street revival in Los Angeles in 1906, 1 takes its name from associations with the phenomenological manifestations of the signs recorded by St Luke in Acts 2 as following the Day of Pentecost outpouring

In: International Journal of Public Theology

William Seymour, an earnest black preacher who brought the Pentecostal message to a small, makeshift mission in Southern California. Thus, the Azusa Street revival (1906–1909) was born. This became the catalyst for a movement that spread around the world. It is important to note that Seymour came to Los

In: Journal of Pentecostal Theology

? Although they are described as the first pentecostal missionaries from America, they did not emerge from the tradition of Charles F. Parham and William J. Seymour as did figures like Andrew G. Johnson (1878–1965) and Louis Osterberg (1856–1933), Swedish Americans who took part in the Azusa Street revival

In: Pneuma

: The Journal of the Society for Pentecostal Studies 4 (Spring 1982): 46–56; see also Dale Irvin, “Drawing All Together in One Bond of Love: The Ecumenical Vision of William J. Seymour and the Azusa Street Revival,” Journal of Pentecostal Theology 6 (1995): 25–53. Multicultural Influences The

In: Pneuma

Pentecostals of 1906- 1908, Christ's coming was considered imminent because they them- selves were the sign of the end time. Almost from the start, the Azusa Street revival represented an empha- sis on the Second Coming that had been absent from the holiness movement. The first issue of the Apostolic Faith, a

In: Pneuma

shorthand for “the descendants of Abraham” and clearly regarded “the black race” as “heathen.” See David Daniels  III , “God Makes No Difference in Nationality: The Fashioning of a New Racial/Nonracial Identity at the Azusa Street Revival,” Enrichment Journal (Spring 2006), n.p.; available online: https

In: Pneuma

-African movement which stood up for freedom and equality, and the interracial and intercultural Azusa Street revival that forms the watershed for worldwide Christian renewal. William Seymour, its spiritual father: 30 Harvey Cox in: Gerald Anderson & Walter Hollenweger, Pentecostals after a Century, 1999, 8, 12. 31

In: Exchange