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Series:

Justyna Włodarczyk

,” that of man’s conquest of the “wild animal,” that the relationship of superior man and inferior dog is continually verified. Indeed, the kind of training methodology represented by Most relies on almost constant “proofing”: on setting a dog up so that he will fail in the correct performance of the task

Series:

Justyna Włodarczyk

could be seen as part of the training apparatus, to recall Michael Peterson’s term), while the leash was the most significant tool in the trainer’s toolbox in the type of training under discussion here. Training off-leash would have been inconceivable within a methodology based on physically influencing

Series:

Carmen M. Cusack

tidal creek. Within 48 hours some fish populated the area. Species included barracuda, shad, gray snapper, schoolmaster snapper, and cubera snapper. The team studied and developed planting methodologies for future restoration projects in the Bahamas. Touristic endeavors into zones with mangroves

Series:

Carmen M. Cusack

describes data collection methodology (e.g., geospatial coordinates) and scientific names. Nomenclature (i.e., common and scientific name) is listed and searchable (Burke Museum, n.d.; i BOL , 2016). Data in the Fish Base describes environment and climate, biology, size, range and distribution, natural

Series:

Justyna Włodarczyk

obsolete in the world of contemporary parenting. But this definition was also becoming obsolete in the world of dog training, which was searching for a methodology that would allow a makeover of this disciplinary field. It was the broader changes in the human-animal relationships in modern society and the

Series:

Joep Leerssen

methodological developments in the twentieth-century historical sciences ( Oberkrone 1993; Hettling 2003 ; Berger & Lorenz, 2008). But the century that has brought us from Arndt 1813 to Jullian 1915 is long enough to demonstrate how the question of the Rhine consistently played into the more general moralistic

Edited by Myriam Díaz Diocaretz

Critical Studies seeks to foster cross-disciplinarity and thus to participate in the ongoing reconfiguration of the Humanities and Social Sciences, while challenging received conceptual frames and perspectives, be they entrenched or 'current'.
To this aim, it publishes guest-edited, multi-authored collections of essays by scholars and intellectuals coming from various disciplinary and cultural backgrounds.
The series welcomes volumes dealing with a vast range of topics, from the most enduring to the most contemporary, such as future and emerging technologies.
Whether topics initially pertain to the fields of gender studies, media studies, postcolonial studies or studies in post-humanism, to name just a few, special consideration is given to collections that:
1. seriously attempt to produce innovative cross-disciplinary analyses by involving multiple theoretical languages and/or cultural areas;
2. do not content themselves with applying methodologies or theories but submit their own gestures and presuppositions to critical scrutiny;
3. endeavor to open new questions and to posit new objects for investigation on the basis of their methodological and theoretical innovation.

The series published two volumes over the last 5 years.

Edited by Theo D'haen and Hans Bertens

Postmodern Studies deals with (any aspect of) postmodernism, or of postmodernity and the postmodern in relation to literature.

Publications in this series can be either of a theoretical or a more practical/analytic nature. They may refer to any one, or to several, literary works, genres, or literatures. They may also refer to the other arts, provided the main focus remain literary. In evaluating contributions, the editors of Postmodern Studies will follow no particular methodological or ideological bias.

All manuscripts accepted in the series first undergo a process of peer review.

Due to rapid developments in literary studies we close the series for new publications.

Narrating Indigenous Modernities

Transcultural Dimensions in Contemporary Māori Literature

Series:

Michaela Moura-Koçoğlu

The Māori of New Zealand, a nation that quietly prides itself on its pioneering egalitarianism, have had to assert their indigenous rights against the demographic, institutional, and cultural dominance of Pākehā and other immigrant minorities – European, Asian, and Polynesian – in a postcolonial society characterized by neocolonial structures of barely acknowledged inequality. While Māori writing reverberates with this struggle, literary identity discourse goes beyond any fallacious dualism of white/brown, colonizer/colonized, or modern/traditional. In a rapidly altering context of globality, such essentialism fails to account for the diverse expressions of Māori identities negotiated across multiple categories of culture, ethnicity, class, and gender.
Narrating Indigenous Modernities recognizes the need to place Māori literature within a broader framework that explores the complex relationship between indigenous culture, globalization, and modernity. This study introduces a transcultural methodology for the analysis of contemporary Māori fiction, where articulations of indigeneity acknowledge cross-cultural blending and the transgression of cultural boundaries.
Thus, Narrating Indigenous Modernities charts the proposition that Māori writing has acquired a fresh, transcultural quality, giving voice to both new and recuperated forms of indigeneity, tribal community, and Māoritanga (Maoridom) that generate modern indigeneities which defy any essentialist homogenization of cultural difference. Māori literature becomes, at the same time, both witness to globalized processes of radical modernity and medium for the negotiation and articulation of such structural transformations in Māoritanga.