Search Results

You are looking at 91 - 100 of 153 items for :

  • All: "presentism" x
  • Morphology & Syntax x
Clear All

Series:

Susan F. Schmerling

segmentation and classification we cannot be sure that any additional “explanations” are needed: perhaps phenomena that seem puzzling at present could be shown to follow in such theories. These points, which ought to be truisms, are worth mentioning because of a tendency in syntactic theory to assume that

Series:

Susan F. Schmerling

This chapter introduces a grammar of the sort that I have called a Sapir-style grammar; it is also, and more recognizably, a Montague-style grammar – recall the discussion in Chapter 1 of the similarities between the two kinds of grammar. The grammar to be presented here focuses on English

Series:

Susan F. Schmerling

7.1 The Problem It is not only German that has preposition-article portmanteaus. French has four, and from a post-Bloomfieldian perspective these have presented the same analytical puzzle as those in German. We will see, however, that the portmanteaus in the two languages are very different

Series:

Pieter A. M. Seuren

is these optional additions that give the Formation Rules their somewhat forbidding appearance. Even so, their treatment in the present system is only provisional and partial. In order to limit the complexity of the system on first acquaintance, verbs with particles ( put down ) or with prepositional

Series:

Pieter A. M. Seuren

mind that the present section is tentative and provisional. Consider first the simple definite NP the man . The assumed SA-structure is shown in (17a), generated by the Formation Rules (4a) and (4b) for English (3.1.1). This structure is to be read as: ‘the x such that x is a man’. What the Formation

Series:

Pieter A. M. Seuren

present form, this hypothesis goes back to James D. McCawley (1938–1999) but it is, in fact, the continuation of medieval and renaissance thinking about language, reaching a first apogee in the great work by the Salamanca professor Franciscus Sanctius, Minerva seu de Causis Linguae Latinae , published in

Series:

Josiah Walters

In A Grammar of Dazaga, Josiah Walters provides the first detailed description and analysis of Dazaga (a Saharan language) in the past half-century. Based on a review of previous work on Dazaga, and with his own more recent data, the author describes the phonology, morphology, and syntax of Dazaga. He provides a new analysis of the categorization of verbs in to classes, demonstrating the prominence of light verb constructions in Dazaga. His analysis of the syntax brings to light several striking features of Dazaga, including optional ergative case marking, mixed alignment of objects, a variety of causative constructions, and verb serialization. Throughout the work, the author relates his findings to work on related languages and to recent typological studies.

Series:

Susan F. Schmerling

’s category splitting gives us a theory of syntactic categories that is sufficient in the context of the overall nsg model presented in Section 2.1. With prosodically characterized operations at hand, it is not traditional parts of speech like “verb” that need to be subcategorized; what has been thought of

Series:

Pieter A. M. Seuren

) it is used as an action verb: It has so far proved impossible to present a general principle determining the correct perfective auxiliary choice. One of the reasons for this is the fact that the languages that distinguish between a have -type and a be -type perfective auxiliary do so in similar but