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Talmud and the Zohar in very high regard, accepting both as revealed Scripture. Ben Israel’s authorship of the Sefer nishmat ḥayyim (1651) testifies to his kabbalistic convictions. 9 This book deals with the immortality of the soul and supposedly bears the mark of Lurianic doctrines. 10 Joseph Dan

In: The Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy

latter infatuated with astronomy, discussed the danger of engaging with philosophy, since, according to Statthagen, “the heart would forever beat in favor of the natural sciences.” 12 Another discussion, on the seven laws of Noah, was based on the Talmud and gained momentum in the seventeenth and

In: The Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy

Scholars have long noted that Rabbi Joseph Soloveitchik spent much of his time at Yeshiva University teaching classes in Talmud. This clear prioritization by Soloveitchik in his teaching carried over into his engagement with the works of Maimonides. While Maimonides’s legal code, his Mishneh

In: The Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy

... 25 It would appear, on the basis of this version, that there is a distinc- tion between the origin of the Oral Law ("a human creation") and the Written Law ("the words of the living God"). Leibowitz makes no reference here to the talmudic maxim, "Both [statements] represent the words of the living

In: The Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy

merciful, the compassionate" (bismi'llah al-rahman al-rahim). For brief com- ments, though the references are incomplete, see Saul Lieberman's Introduction to his edition of Hilkhoth Ha-Yerushalmi (The Laws of the Palestinian Talmud) of Rabbi Moses ben Maimon (Heb.) (New York/Jerusalem, 1947), p. 5, n. 7

In: The Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy

of the Talmudic adage that in the generation preceding the Messianic era, Hutzpa will reign. He interprets this Hutzpa as the coarseness required for the revelation of the highest secrets of Torah. See, for example, Arpelei Tohar, 42. 18 Arpelei Tohar, 44-45. 19 OrotHakodeshI, 110-111. 20 See Harav

In: The Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy

for sharing his reflections on this expression. Compare with Maria Eva Subtelny, “The Tale of the Four Sages Who Entered the ‘Pardes’: A Talmudic Enigma from a Persian Perspective,” Jewish Studies Quarterly 11, nos. 1–2 (2004): 3–58. 64 Dancing behind the veil of this expression of יטמ אלו יטמ or mati

In: The Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy

describe ultimate happiness is that of the ḥuppa , literally “wedding canopy,” and by metonymy, the marriage ceremony itself. In this connection the author interprets the following talmudic saying: Rabba in the name of R. Joḥanan said: The Holy One, blessed be He, will make seven canopies for each

In: The Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy

hidden source from which all being emanates or as the inner life force that pulsates throughout the cos- mos. One of the basic expressions of this new relation in Talmudic literature is in the explanation given for the fact that God is referred to in Mishnaic Hebrew as "the place." The explanation

In: The Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy

, capable of annihilating it at will. In this respect the biblical concept of the divine is quite distinct from the Near Eastern nature gods, which are immanent in the natural world. The midrashic-aggadic tradition of the Talmud, while not presenting a systematic theology, in:troduces no essential changes

In: The Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy