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1 Introduction Although there were precursors to modern Pentecostalism, 1 most historians credit the movement’s origin to the Azusa Street Revival in Los Angeles, California, led by Pastor William J. Seymour, in 1906. 2 Early Pentecostals believed that this spiritual revival was

In: Ecclesiology

any nation, tongue, or tribe. Chiquete notes, “By their very nature the Pentecostals are natural promoters of plurality and inner-cultural contact.” 11 In the Azusa Street Revival, one finds the message of a God active in history born among the poor and racially, sexually (gender), and economically

In: Pneuma

has been exposed to a multitude of local and global cultural idioms. In this respect, Pentecostalism has after the Azusa Street revival of 1906––which has been conventionally regarded as the sectarian revival that commenced the movement––adapted itself to the modern world and differing socio

In: Annual Review of the Sociology of Religion

of the holiness experience, and seeking for an unimpeach- able sign of assurance that Spirit baptism had taken place, which led to the birth of the pentecostal movement. The new movement, however, was not Spirit-centered. The Azusa Street revival focused its emphasis upon the atoning work of Christ

In: Pneuma

, "For Such a Time as This: The Story of Bishop William J. Seymour and the Azusa Street Revival," unpublished Ph.D dissertation (Birmingham University, 1981). The essential black contribution to Pentecostalism is often over- . looked, as recently as in the Article by James Earl Massey, "The Black

In: Pneuma

tragic racism that followed the Azusa Street Revival stands as an evil contradiction to the embracive work of the Holy Spirit . . . for almost a century, North American Pentecostals perpetuated the evil of racism. Though the history of Pentecostalism is tragically marked by the dark evil of racism, the

In: Pneuma

the Azusa Street Revival. Men and women transcended the traditional gender roles and submitted themselves to one another’s gifts and callings. Those who believed that it was a sin to shed blood opposed the Great War and did not enlist. 2 But those who misunderstood the fervor came forth to criticize

In: Pneuma

Chicago's North Avenue Mission. Durham embraced the Pentecostal experience during a visit to the Azusa Street revival in 1907. He felt that the Holiness position on sanctification was unscriptural and without validation in experience. In 1910, in a sermon at a Pentecostal convention in Chicago, Durham set

In: Pneuma

/Pentecostal studies. The significance for us today, however, is that the same basic thesis can be helpful in understanding holiness and Pentecostal relationships. The Methodist holiness movement had always maintained throughout its seventy-year history prior to the Azusa Street revival that it represented mainline

In: Pneuma

in Canada, had been given during the Los Angeles Azusa Street Revival of 1906 that a great revival would begin in Northern Canada.3 Those involved in the Latter Rain Movement looked upon events at North Battleford in 1948 as a fulfillment of this prophecy.4 The Latter Rain Movement originated at

In: Pneuma