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-guard one's yoke is by living alone. To empha- size the sex-segregated life's appropriateness, Aphrahat calls it "loving kadishuta." Aphrahat extols those who do not marry and who "remain by themselves." A man who lives apart from women, "loves kadishuta" and by definition is also celibate. Yet, what is the

In: Vigiliae Christianae
Author: K.A.D. Smelik

that even Rabbula, the champion of Orthodoxy, clearly shared conceptions of this kind as shown in his life and work.s Besides, the Song of the Pearl in the A. Th. was a Cf. Kirsten, o.c., col. 577/8. A more expanded argumentation in JbAC 6 (1963) 144-172. 4 Cf. e.g. A. F. J. Klijn, The Acts of Thomas

In: Vigiliae Christianae
Author: Daniel F. Caner

indicate that self-castration was sometimes adopted by male ascetics to allay suspicion which might otherwise arise from their living with female ascetics. Its prohibition was concomitant not only with a growing concern to determine acceptable ascetic practice, but acceptable social practices between

In: Vigiliae Christianae

before Symeon's death, although posthumously updated by a disciple of Theodoret; and the Syriac Life of Symeon, a considerably longer and more fantastic hagiography, composed ca. 470. Each text plainly has its hagiographical format and apologetic biases, and each author drew upon and balanced a number of

In: Vigiliae Christianae
Author: Steenberg

. He shows through the example of his own life, patience and suffering endurance, the path that all should follow. It is in living human life the way the Son lived human life, that the subhuman reality of a fallen economy is overcome. Christ is the example of a new and better way. With respect to

In: Vigiliae Christianae
Author: Robert Sider

together have motivated its final complex form. One notes, first, that here as elsewhere the principle of preparation has given the section its own little praemunitio. In chapter V Tertullian prepares the way for his laudatio by some initial reflections which support his case and clear away a major

In: Vigiliae Christianae

thief and there will be judgment (3:lOf). The implication of the certainty of judgment is moral living (3:11, 14; 1:4). It is clear from the context, then, that the function of the Parousia- judgment in II Peter is to motivate moral behavior. To deny the judg- ment, however, is a rationalization for

In: Vigiliae Christianae

essential for human life. So the physical and the psychic are intimately woven together: c6 ?uXtx6v crUVt1tÀ<ÍXTj TM ?u6cxc;? (§ 44: MPG 40.709). Thus, a living creature is composed of soul and body; the body is not a living creature by itself, nor is the soul, but soul and body together. (§ 49: MPG 40

In: Vigiliae Christianae
Author: John R. Meyer

symbolizes the gift of self motivated by the idea that life belongs to God; we offer back to him that which never really ceased to be his. See R. de Vaux, Les Sacrifices de L'Ancien Testament (Paris: Gabalda, 1964), 87; Louis Bouyer, The Eternal Son. A Theology of the Word of God and Chn'stologv (Huntington

In: Vigiliae Christianae

uncontested future ?ao[tat in the second apodosis. The dif- ference between the readings, apparently, is between a future and a present reality. "I shall be a word of God" suggests the new life of the bishop after his martyrdom in the presence of the living God. "I am a word of God" implies an "incarnation

In: Vigiliae Christianae