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A STUDY OF A SPECIES OF ACROBELOIDES (CEPHALOBIDAE) IN LABORATORY CULTURE BY W. L. NICHOLAS Department of Zoology, School of General Studies Australian National University, Canberra, Australia A species of Acrobeloides, probably A. buetschblii, has been cultured axenically (i.e. aseptically

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SHORT COMMUNICATIONS W. L. NICHOLAS and A. C. STEWART1): Experiments on anhydrobiosis in Acrobeloides nanus (de Man, 1880) Anderson, 1986. (Nematoda). Acrobeloides nanus (de Man, 1880) Anderson, 1986 is widely distributed in Australian soils. We have cultured this species on soil extract agar

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publication will focus only on experiments done internally at former DuPont Crop Protection laboratories with the root-knot nematodes Meloidogyne incognita and M. hapla and compare them to experiments done with the free-living bacterial-feeding nematode Acrobeloides buetschlii . Materials and methods

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of the species are inferred from molecular data and places P. lobata in a clade that unites genera with mostly simple morphology of the labial region, like Cephalobus , Acrobeloides , Heterocephalobellus and Metacrobeles , but also includes species of Zeldia and Chiloplacus . Keywords – molecular

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, nematodes with greatest abundance in field and grass, and nematodes that showed no significant differences or inconsistent differences with habitat features (Table 5). Some of the nematodes in the last group were relatively uncommon ( e.g. , Seinura , Aporcelaimellus ), but Acrobeloides and

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visible in the intact embryo and those requiring experimental interference. Particularly obvious differences of both types were revealed between C. elegans (Rhabditidae)and Acrobeloides nanus (Cephalobidae).Not only does the spatial and temporal pattern of early events differ but also that of

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-natural conditions. A widespread soil nematode, the bacterial feeder Acrobeloides buetschlii , was used as a model organism. Bacterial prey were the frequent bulk soil gram-positive taxon Bacillus subtilis (Garbeva et al ., 2003 ; McSpadden Gardener, 2004 ) and the dominant rhizosphere gram-negative taxon

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, significantly more beneficial nematodes were found in soils amended with C. mangga than in soil amended with C. longa (Fig. 4). In Experiment 3, a total of ten genera of bacterivores ( Rhabditis (c-p 1), Acrobeles , Acrolobus , Acrobeloides , Cephalobus , Eucephalobus , Microlaimus , Pristionchus

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) (see Tables 2, 3). Acrobeloides was found the most abundant from soil while Aphelenchoides was dominant from litter. Among identified taxa, Teratolobus sp. (Cephalobidae: Acrolobinae) and T. tentaculatum (Bicirronematidae) were selected for sequencing as they are the first molecular data in

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Aphelenchoides were included in the second trophic group of fungal-feeding nematodes. Cephalobus , Eucephalobus , Acrobeles , Acrobeloides , Rhabditis and Wilsonema were in the third trophic group of bacterial-feeding nematodes. The fourth trophic group was omnivorous nematodes, including nematodes in

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