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understood the spiritual language others were speaking [ xenolalia ]. 4 As early as February 1907, secular newspapers even carried news of the Azusa Street revival in Los Angeles, stating that it “not only bordered on the miraculous, but, if anything, out-pentecosted Pentecost itself … The unlearned are

In: Asia Pacific Pentecostalism

the distinctive sentiment for their own country folk and the sense of belonging. Conclusion The Hong Kong Pentecostal Mission grew out of the Congregationalist tradition and the Latter Rain message of the Azusa Street Revival, which was brought to Hong Kong by the Garrs, the McIntoshes, Anna Deane, J

In: Asia Pacific Pentecostalism

This essay explores the relationship between black theology and renewal theology and assesses the ongoing relevance of black theology to the mission and future of the black churches. Recent writings by Eddie Glaude, Raphael Warnock, James Cone, and Peter Paris are considered in conversation with the works of Brian Bantam, J. Kameron Carter, and Willie Jennings, whose imaginative attention to Christology, pneumatology, and ecclesiology provokes thoughtful engagement of issues of race, gender, power, and privilege in the context of renewal and the global impact of Pentecostalism more than a century after the Azusa Street Revival led by William J. Seymour.

In: Pneuma

Abstract

While the phenomenon of glossolalia in general has received great attention and various forms of analysis (linguistic, psychological, neurological, and so forth), the practice of corporate singing in tongues, a staple of the Azusa Street Revival, has received little attention or exploration in the literature. This article performs an audio analysis on recorded samples of corporate tongues-singing in order to identify what is happening musically when a group of people sing in tongues together. This analysis reveals several key features that recur across the recordings. Sustained prominent pitches are always present, related in the mathematical ratios of the major scale. In most instances, the pitches form both a tonic chord and dominant chord simultaneously, creating an effect of tension and resolution. These findings point toward the creative possibilities of surrendering autonomy and the deep grounding of the individual within the community and the created order.

In: Pneuma

[German Version] On Jan 2, 1901, the Bethel Bible School in Topeka, Kansas, headed by C.F. Parham, experienced pneumatic phenomena, which were interpreted as missionary preparation and “baptism in the Spirit” (as in Acts 2). From 1906 to 1913, the “Azusa Street Revival” in Los Angeles, led by

In: Religion Past and Present Online

segment of Christianity around the world. The Azusa Street Revival which sparked the global expansion of Pentecostalism occurred in 1906 in the city of Los Angeles under the leadership of African American pastor William J. Seymour. In the 1920s evangelist Aimee Semple McPherson chose Los Angeles as the

In: Pneuma

segment of Christianity around the world. The Azusa Street Revival which sparked the global expansion of Pentecostalism occurred in 1906 in the city of Los Angeles under the leadership of African American pastor William J. Seymour. In the 1920s evangelistAimee Semple McPherson chose Los Angeles as the

In: Pneuma

of scholarship Pope-Levison calls for, as Alexander shows that these women were, to use Pope-Levison’s phrase, co-creators of the Azusa Street revival. This chapter is a helpful guide for historians seeking to understand the connections between these traditions, and the ways that the lines

In: Pneuma

as a group which participates in the Pentecostal experience but does not trace its development directly to the Azusa Street revival. Also, the inclusion of the Messianic Jewish movement is due to its charismatic origins; the growth of the charismatic when compared to non- charismatic Jewish

In: Pneuma

American Pentecostal history. Racism was an influence behind many important developments in early Pentecos- talism such as the relationship between Charles F. Parham and William J. Seymour, the rise and decline of Azusa Street Revival, the theological controversies, and the prominence of C. H. Mason, the

In: Pneuma