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wonders, “Who would ever choose this life?” There are a number of other films that represent Jesuits in a variety of ways: There is Irvin Kershner’s The Hoodlum Priest , William Friedkin’s ​ The Exorcist, Bruce Beresford’s Black Robe, and Costa-Gavras’s Amen , among others. Is the portrayal of the

In: Journal of Jesuit Studies

J. Paul Getty Museums, Los Angeles, 2013. Pp. 128. Pb, $20.00 In this book, accompanying an exhibition at the J. Paul Getty Museum in Los Angeles, the authors take a fresh look at Peter Paul Rubens’s black and red chalk drawing of A Man in Korean Costume , situating it not in the artist

In: Journal of Jesuit Studies

volume contains eighteen relatively short contributions, some of only a few pages. Four of the contributions are in English; the rest in Italian. The volume concludes with thirty-three pages of black and white images and photos. It lacks an index. For a volume as wide-ranging and rich in information as

In: Journal of Jesuit Studies

Garden of Gethsemane and with Jesus of the via cruci s (way of sorrows), he is now able to offer what should have been the core of his ministry—love. This is an apex that evokes the conclusion of another film about Jesuit missionaries, Bruce Beresford’s 1991 Black Robe (which is a namesake of the

In: Journal of Jesuit Studies

The now two-decade-old renaissance in studies of the early modern inquisitions has reached a point where large-scale syntheses have begun to appear. The works of Christopher Black, Andrea Del Col, and Francisco Bethencourt in particular have provided overviews of inquisitorial operations across

In: Journal of Jesuit Studies

the product of a black ops maneuver on the part of the new Stuart regime, directed not just against those who had built the bomb but also against their Jesuit clergy friends, including the Jesuit mission superior, Henry Garnet. On this account, whatever the accused had done, it was not what the regime

In: Journal of Jesuit Studies

well as contemporary testimonies about him. A great deal of new information is presented. Schreck’s birthplace, Bingen in the Black Forest, is identified as well as records of his university studies at Freiburg. Schreck’s peregrinations in central Europe, which took him from his native Swabia to the

In: Journal of Jesuit Studies

’s establishment in the middle years of the sixteenth century and its suppression in all Portuguese territories in the second half of the eighteenth century. Thus, there is generally a polemical side to Pereira Gomes’s writings, since he struggles to disprove the black legend that in Portugal presented the Jesuits

In: Journal of Jesuit Studies

creation of the Church of Satan and performances by Black Metal bands that invoke Satan. I, for one, have not figured out in what sense the book is a social history. Assuming that social history is the research into social change, the social composition of societies, social causes of historical events, or

In: Journal of Jesuit Studies

particularly impressed with the congregation of businessmen from all over Europe at Rua Nova dos Mercadores (114). In chapter 3, Kate Lowe mentions Jesuit promotion of a system of rotating processions of black African “nations,” where each of the twenty diverse nations had their own flag (62). The mixed

In: Journal of Jesuit Studies