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hegemonic power of the United States allowed Castro's revolution to succeed. Eisenhower's operational style as well as Dulles's failing health made for uncoordinated and ineffective decisionmaking tha...

In: The SHAFR Guide Online

Bibliographic entry in Chapter 14: The United States and the Early Cold War, 1945-1961 | Regional and Bilateral Studies authorDobson, Alan P.imprintNew York: Routledge, 1995.annotationDobson challenges the view that the United States held hegemonic power over Great Britain in the immediate post

In: The SHAFR Guide Online

Bibliographic entry in Chapter 28: Economic Issues and U.S. Foreign Relations | Historiography authorIlgen, Thomas L.imprintTotowa: Rowman & Allanheld, 1985.annotationIlgen maintains that the United States, as hegemonic power, used its influence to build a post-World War II economic order that

In: The SHAFR Guide Online

Bibliographic entry in Chapter 14: The United States and the Early Cold War, 1945-1961 | International Economic Relations authorIlgen, Thomas L.imprintTotowa: Rowman and Allanheld, 1985.annotationIlgen maintains that the United States, as hegemonic power, used its influence to build a post

In: The SHAFR Guide Online

Bibliographic entry in Chapter 14: The United States and the Early Cold War, 1945-1961 | Regional and Bilateral Studies authorPaterson, Thomas G.imprintNew York: Oxford University Press, 1994.annotationBased on extensive archival research, Paterson argues that a variety of limits on the hegemonic

In: The SHAFR Guide Online

Mesopotamia (652–648 bce). Josiah experienced the ultimate end of Neo-Assyrian hegemonic power with the destruction of Nineveh (612 bce). After Assyria's withdrawal from Palestine (626–623 bce), Josiah was forma...

In: Religion Past and Present Online

Winnifred Fallers Sullivan, Elizabeth Shakman Hurd, Saba Mahmood, and Peter G. Danchin (Eds.), Politics of Religious Freedom  105 Jessica L. Radin Volume 8, nos. 2–3 Special Issue Hegemony, Power and Truth in Post-revolutionary Tunisia Articles The

In: Middle East Law and Governance

-a-vis the hegemonic power. And yet while I want to restrict my definition to instances where the margin or power differential is really great, I do not mean to suggest that there is ever any moment when a hegemonic power is omnipotent and capable of 102 doing anything it wants. Omnipotence does not

In: International Journal of Comparative Sociology

we do not live in isolation. Many authors prefer the term auto/biography to reflect the interconnectedness and interdependence of biography with autobiography ( Stanley, 1993 ). Biographical perspectives offer opportunities for us to explore – and to challenge – normativity, hegemony, power and

In: Storytelling: Global Reflections on Narrative

stabiliser’. 29 Following these insights, Gilpin, in The Political Economy of International Relations (1987), contends that the construction and the functioning of a liberal world economy necessitate the existence of a hegemonic power. As he writes, ‘an open and liberal world economy requires the

In: Crises and Hegemonic Transitions