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Yuqian Yan

This article examines the effect and affect of historical representations in wartime Chinese theater and cinema, as well as the interplay between the two media. With the burgeoning of late Ming stories on stage and on screen, the fall of the Ming became a “chosen trauma” that connects the nation’s past with its historical present. However the traumatic fate of the nation was never the actual subject of representation, but served to enhance the affective power of tragic‐heroic figures. Focusing on A Ying’s Sorrow for the Fall of the Ming, one of the most popular wartime historical plays, the paper studies the narrative structure, performance style and adaptation strategy of the play to demonstrate how patriotic spirit was foregrounded as the key to national survival. It was through the audience’s resonation with the characters’ passionate speech on stage and on screen that individuals’ emotional attachment to the nation was consolidated, both horizontally across space and vertically through history.

Stephanie SU

This paper examines the visual representation of the famous poem The Song of Everlasting Sorrow in modern China. Painted by Li Yishi in 1929, this sequential set of paintings was based on the Tang poet Bai Juyi’s poem, written under the same title. First shown at the National Art Exhibition in Shanghai and then published as an illustrated book in 1932, Li’s work rekindled public imagination of the tragic romance. Li’s choice of subject, format, as well as style and its mixed reviews raise crucial questions regarding the notion of realism and the authenticity of historical representation. This paper argues that Li’s work revealed new transmedia aesthetics and cross-cultural fascination with China’s past that shaped the cultural identity of East Asia in the early twentieth century.

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Joyce C. H. Liu

Wang Guowei's translations of utilitarian ethics and education theory reveal clearly the role that he played at Education World and as a Chinese intellectual. His participation in the public discourse fit into the plans of Luo Zhenyu both at the journal and later at the Ministry of Education of the late Qing government. Those theories of ethics and education Wang and Luo introduced became the main axis of Chinese ethical thought throughout the twentieth century; they defined the terms in which the subject related to society or the state. This essay points out that, during his exploration of the limits of Western and classical Chinese ethics, Wang’s own philosophical writings at the time analyzed the limitations of dualism in the ethical discourse both in the West and in Chinese classical philosophy. Wang demonstrated a critique of utilitarianism and life-ism (生生主義) that was popular at the time. As well as a critique, he also developed an aesthetic and ethical view: no-life-ism (無生主義).

Arthur Cooper

Edited by Imre Galambos

quite natural and obvious to the Greeks when producing a dictionary of their own language, unless it is a specialised dictionary of modern spoken or ‘Demotic’ Greek only, or of Homer or some other specialised subject, to include all Greek in it. Before me for instance is a dictionary published in

Arthur Cooper

Edited by Imre Galambos

disjunctive ; not quite like our notions of a subject being linked to the verb, and the verb to an object. “ A Balbus (& Co.) Built Wall”, however, can when necessary, be distinguished from this sentence by giving warning of the coming conjunction of an object, that is, an object in Chinese grammatical

Arthur Cooper

Edited by Imre Galambos

politics and other such subjects proper to poets, have reservations about his work in general. His youth was undoubtedly wild, and in it he played the part of what is variously translated ‘knight-errant’ and, rather more appropriately, ‘roving brave’. ‘Condottiere’ might also convey the meaning. He duelled

Arthur Cooper

Edited by Imre Galambos

be kept out and subjects of the Empire to be kept at home (these were always, as much as direct defence, the purposes of the Great Wall); lest China’s superior technology got into the wrong hands. In such a state of confidence it was natural for the Ch’ien Lung Emperor (1736–1796) to regard Lord

Arthur Cooper

Edited by Imre Galambos

which he addressed to the Emperor on the subject during his term as an ‘Omissioner’ together with others on other subjects, survive amongst his Collected Works; and their courage and outspokenness—even though in the accepted tradition of that office—are striking. Po Chü-i believed in the Confucian

Arthur Cooper

Edited by Imre Galambos

man (man of the country).’ (378 A ) 臣 minister In this 臣 (378 A ) ‘chén’ is ‘a servant; subject, minister’. 大臣 (110 G …) ‘dàchén’ is a ‘Minister, Principal Secretary of State’ in a monarchy; in Sino-Japanese, ‘daijin’: 外務大臣 (151 B  – 141 A …), ‘gaimudaijin’ in Japanese, is the ‘(Imperial) Secretary

Arthur Cooper

Edited by Imre Galambos

contributed to the expression ‘The Great White Tsar’, used of the former Russian Emperors when addressing subject peoples. ‘Tsar’ certainly comes from ‘Caesar’ and possibly the rest via the Mongols who had a ‘Great White Khan’, probably from the apparent components of the Chinese 皇 (325 D : 104 E  + 78