Search Results

Eveliina Ojala

conducting research on the subject and by regularly updating Finnish confirmation curriculum. This is seen at a practical level, for example, by taking social media into consideration as a part of Finnish confirmation programme. Concurrently, the aim of obtaining a sense of community in a confirmation group

Jos de Kock

a questionnaire study in an article entitled Finnish confirmands’ social media use and experience of the sense of community—how they are reflected in confirmands’ community perceptions about their parish . This article approaches the subject of confirmation preparation, taking into consideration

Toward Re-Enchantment of the Cosmos

Responding to Andrew Root’s Faith Formation in a Secular Age

David F. White

distinguishes the pre-modern and modern age not in terms of different beliefs, but as inhabiting radically different conditions for belief. For example, in the pre-modern world, the self was experienced as porous, subject to the atmospheric magical and spiritual mystery afoot in the cosmos. On the other hand

Coming of Age in the Reformation

Martin Luther’s Theology of Children and Adolescence

Joel Mayward

histories and adult viewpoints in mind when reading Luther’s writings on childhood and youth, as he too was an adult writing about children from a particular social context in Germany. Some scholars feel that the sources available about children during this period are so problematic that the subject cannot

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Rima Nasrallah

This paper traces the development of Christian education in Lebanon and its various influences on society. Christian education is closely related to socio-political circumstances in this country and is both a reflection of its many phases and a reaction to it. Due to the Ottoman Empire’s millet system, religious education started with and continued as the responsibility of the separate religious communities. Since the late eighteenth century, Western Jesuit and later Anglo-American Protestant missions added more layers and complexities to Christian education. Despite all their merits and the richness they brought, the various missions unknowingly loaded the subject of Christian education with spiritual, cultural, and political stress. In turn, the political developments of the twentieth century culminating in the long civil war, splintered the religious communities and affected their way of teaching religion. Post-war Lebanon still carries within it the legacies of the Ottoman Empire, the fingerprint of Western missionaries, the prejudices of Arab nationalism, and the bitter memories of a war tainted with religious differences.

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Edited by Eva Alcón Soler and Maria-Pilar Safont-Jordà

Studies on discourse and language learning originated in the field of general education and they focused on first language learning environments. However, since 1980s research on discourse and language learning broadened the scope of investigation to respond to second and foreign language environments. Recently, the emergence of new language learning contexts such as computer mediated communication, multilingual settings or content and language integrated contexts requires further research that focuses on discourse and language learning. From this perspective, the present volume aims to broaden the scope of investigation in foreign language contexts by exploring discourse patterns in the classroom and examining the impact of factors such as gender, explicitness of feedback or L1 use on language learning through discourse. With that aim in mind, this volume will bring together research that investigates discourse in various instructional settings, namely those of primary, secondary and university L2 learning environments, content and language integrated contexts and other new language learning settings. The number and variety of languages involved both as the first language (e.g. English, Finnish, Basque, Spanish, Japanese, French, Italian, Catalan) as well as the target foreign language (e.g. English, French, Italian, Japanese, Spanish) makes the volume specially attractive. Additionally, the different approaches adopted by the researchers participating in this volume, such as information processing, sociocultural theory, or conversation analysis, widen the realm of investigation on discourse and language learning. Finally, the strength of the volume also lies in the range of educational settings (primary, secondary and tertiary education) and the worldwide representation of contributors across seven different countries, namely those of Spain, France, Austria, Finland, Germany, Canada, Australia and the United States. The uniqueness of the volume is due to its eclectic and comprehensive nature in tackling instructional discourse. Worldwide outstanding researchers, like Julianne House, Carme Muñoz, Ute Smit, Tarja Nikula or Roy Lyster, to quote but a few, adopt different perspectives in this joint contribution that will certainly broaden the scope of research on language learners’ discourse.

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Manasa Dzirikure and Garth Allen

Len Kageler

The subject of burn-out has received a great deal of popular and academic attention, as the issue is a common problem and experience in both the United States and European Union context. This paper, after a representative literature review, presents and analyzes findings about burnout among youth workers. In Fall 2006 a survey on youth ministry burn out was conducted by the author in the United States, with an N of 155. The identical survey was conducted in 2008 among youth workers in the European Union, with an eventual N of 98. This research will be of interest not only to youth ministry practitioners, but those who teach youth workers as well.

Boris Paschke

sources critically, Abdel Gawad seeks to either de-radicalise them or prevent their radicalisation. Hicham Abdel Gawad has written a worthwhile and instructive book on an increasingly relevant subject matter. The book encourages all religious youth workers to approach their ministry with a combination

Meeting Metalheads

Encountering the Stranger as a Hermeneutical and Spiritual Exercise

André Mulder

context; and students’ religious development can be seen as hermeneutics of an active subject. 6 The religious educator is a hermeneutic juggler, balancing these threefold hermeneutics in his didactics in order to foster the students’ search for meaning and to support their personal construction of a