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the letter mem was intentionally omitted at the end of the line to save space, but it is quite reasonable that this spelling is an early adaptation of the tradition that later became commonplace in Judeo-Spanish, i.e., transforming bet-haḥayím into be ծ axé . c. There is divergence between

In: Journal of Jewish Languages

to the majority language (Poll 1965). Thus, it has been, from the start, open to the adoption and adaptation of English words and grammatical constructions, both to supplement and to replace Yiddish ones. For example, the Yiddish word geyn means both ‘(to) go’ and ‘walk.’ In HY, geyn is being

In: Journal of Jewish Languages

. sacrificio ), alforia~alhoria~foria 29 ‘liberty’ (Sp. libertad ), alḥad ‘Sunday’ (Arabic adaptation; Sp. domingo ), alimaria ~ animalia ~ alimania ‘animal’ (Sp. animal ), apuntadura ‘Hebrew vowel system (from Sp. punto ‘dot’; Hb. niqqud ),’ arnaçio ~ arnançio ~ generaçio ~ generancio

In: Journal of Jewish Languages