Noll, M.

Black, William (10.11.1760 Huddersfield – 8.9.1834 Halifax, Nova Scotia); wesleyanischer Methodistenpfarrer (Methodisten). B. kam 1775 mit seiner Familie von England nach Nova Scotia und hatte bald darauf ein Bekehrungserlebnis. Durch seine Reisetätigkeit gelangte der bis dahin amer. geprägte

Wilson, R.McL.

Black, Matthew (3.9.1908 Kilmarnock, Schottland – 2.10.1994 St. Andrews), einer der führenden Neutestamentler seiner Generation. Nach dem Examen an der Universität Glasgow und der Promotion in Deutschland bei Paul Kahle an der Universität Bonn wurde B.1954 Prof. of Biblical Criticism an der

Series:

Patrick D. Bowen

Abstract

Islam became a significant force in African American culture during the 1920s due in large part to the religion’s endorsement by the immensely popular black nationalist movement led by Marcus Garvey. Garvey’s Universal Negro Improvement Association, which promoted not only black emigration and economic independence, but also cultural pride and the resistance to white oppression, emerged slowly in the late 1910s but by the early 1920s had become the largest African American organization in history, and it therefore had a tremendous impact on black culture at the time. Its rise to prominence, as this chapter argues, was largely due to its effective use of mass media; its attractive economic, political, and religious programs and concepts; and its successful recruiting of pre-existing social networks, especially those of churches. Through these efforts, Garvey’s movement became particularly influential in the realm of black religion, and when Muslims and Islamic ideas started connecting with the movement and its leaders, there was the potential for African Americans across the United States being widely exposed to Islam for the first time. This chapter examines the early years of Garvey’s movement, just prior to it becoming an unprecedented force in the spread of Islam.

Black, Vaughan

Collected Courses of the Hague Academy of International Law Volume: 302 Brill | Nijhoff, Leiden | Boston, 2003, Abstract In his course dedicated to foreign currency obligations in private international law, Vaughan Black, Professor at Dalhousie Law School in Halifax, examines the problem of

Black, George

, tourist accounts, and U.S. official records, Black offers a trenchant critique of the Good Neighbor Policy in Central America and the Caribbean.keywordsCaribbean; Central America; culture; racism; Good...

Black, George

, tourist accounts, and U.S. official records, Black offers a trenchant critique of the Good Neighbor Policy in Central America and the Caribbean.keywordsinter-American relations; economic dependency; Caribbe...

Black, Jeremy

Bibliographic entry in Chapter 3: From the Confederation to the Civil War | The War of 1812 authorBlack, JeremyimprintNorman: University of Oklahoma Press, 2009.annotationPrimarily an operational history, Black stresses the international aspects of the war.keywordsWar of 1812; military affairs

Black, Vaughan

Black, Vaughan, Keywords: Contracts | Damages | Currency depreciation | Law of contracts | Private international law |, Mots clefs: Contrats | Dommages-intérêts | Dépréciation des monnaies | Droit des obligations | Droit international privé |, In his course dedicated to foreign currency

Black, Jeremy

the domestic context, emphasizing the role played in shaping policy by king, Parliament, lobbies, and public opinion. Magisterial in his judgments, Black holds that policy was more reactive than purposef...

Education and Society in Florentine Tuscany

Teachers, Pupils and Schools, c. 1250-1500

Series:

Robert Black

Scholarship on pre-university education in Italy during the Middle Ages and Renaissance has been dominated by studies of individual towns or by general syntheses of Italy as a whole; in contrast, this work offers not only an archival study of a region but also attempts to discern crucial local variations on a comparative basis. It documents mass literacy in the city of Florence; the school curriculum in the individual Florentine subject towns, as well as in the city of Florence itself; the decline of church education and the rise of lay schools; the development of communal schools in Florentine Tuscany up to 1400; and teachers, schools and pupils in the city of Florence during the fifteenth century.