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Philip L. Tite

CATEGORICAL DESIGNATIONS AND METHODOLOGICAL REDUCTIONISM: GNOSTICISM AS CASE STUDY1 PHILIP L. TITE Debate continues between reductionists and non-reductionists over sui generis discourse within the academic study of religion. In this article, Gnosticism is explored as a case study for applying

Amy L. Koehlinger

is a test to see how More than Belief plays to an audience of scholars whose interests are not as immediately linked to Vásquez’s project, to see how his diagnosis of our field reads to those who are not predisposed to agree with him, to ask what his methodological shift might illuminate for

Hip-Hop and the Study of Religion

Diagnoses and Possibilities

L. Benjamin Rolsky

-hop and religion, Religion and Hip-Hop sets the terms for future work on the topic in a manner that defines parameters while making amble room for further investigations and explorations into the complexities and play inherent in the art form. Such methodological and epistemic diversity, along with the

Jeffrey R. Carter

DESCRIPTION IS NOT EXPLANATION: A METHODOLOGY OF COMPARISON JEFFREY R. CARTER This essay presents a methodological framework for the comparative study of religion by analyzing academic description and explanation. It demonstrates how these two methods are in fact different forms of comparison

Michael Lambek

To be an adherent of a tradition is always to enact some further stage in the development of one’s tradition. (MacIntyre 1988 :11) Epistemological Considerations Across the Disciplines I begin with two claims. 1 The first is that behind questions of methodology lie those of epistemology

Russell T. McCutcheon

1997 essay, I thought could work together. For what I once termed theory-as-critique I would today rather name more precisely as a rigorous historicization of the tools (including the categories) that we, as scholars, use—an exercise in keeping, I would argue, with understanding methodology as the

The Science of Religion: A Defence

Essays by Donald Wiebe

Series:

Donald Wiebe

Edited by Anthony Palma

Donald Wiebe, Professor of Philosophy of Religion at Trinity College, University of Toronto, has spent much of his academic career arguing for a clear demarcation between Theology and Religious Studies. The Science of Religion: A Defence offers a brilliant overview of Professor Wiebe's contributions on methodology in the academic study of religion, of the development of his thinking over time, and of his intellectual commitment to 'a science of religion'.

The work is divided into three parts. The first part identifies pertinent connections between 'religion', 'religious studies', and 'science' and why 'reductionism' in the academic study of religion, when properly applied, can bridge the explanatory gap between the sceptic and the devotee. The second part treats conceptual debates in the academic study of religion, with particular reference to the place of 'belief', 'understanding', and 'meaning' in the modern study of religion. The third part addresses the theological resistance to the scientific study of religion and how that resistance can be overcome. Finally, two new essays are included: a critique on ‘The Preconceptions of a Science of Religion’ by Anthony J. Palma, and an accompanying reply by Donald Wiebe.

The Science of Religion: A Defence is an essential resource for both scholarly and non-scholarly audiences alike, and will be of particular interest to both defenders and critics of a scientific study of religion.

John Daniels

How new is neo-phenomenology? A comparison of the methodologies of Gerardus van der Leeuw and Jacques Waardenburg JOHN DANIELS Abstract In this article, an attempt is made to relate the "intuitive" classical phe- nomenology of Gerardus van der Leeuw and the neo-phenomenology of Jacques

John Daniels

How new is neo-phenomenology? A comparison of the methodologies of Gerardus van der Leeuw and Jacques Waardenburg JOHN DANIELS Abstract In this article, an attempt is made to relate the "intuitive" classical phe- nomenology of Gerardus van der Leeuw and the neo-phenomenology of Jacques

John C. Seitz

point into a broader reflection on methods in the ethnographic study of religion. It will be helpful to have some of the details of Val’s experience in mind before venturing onto the terrain of methodological reflection. In fact, it is precisely the particularity of Val’s feelings that I want to lift up