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ἀκούουσιν as al-khurs wa-l-ṣumm yasmaʿūna (“the deaf and the dumb hear”). Again, this is by no means a pointless addition, nor a literal translation; it is a new piece of quantitative exegesis through which the translator seeks to highlight the fact that Jesus healed not only those with hearing problems

In: Intellectual History of the Islamicate World

Thanks to the work of Ahmad Hasnawi and Jon McGinnis, among others, Ibn Sīnā’s transformation of the Aristotelian physics tradition is now well-established. 1 In the Physics of Kitāb al-Shifāʾ ( The Book of Healing ), Ibn Sīnā develops a new system that “defies being classified as simply

In: Intellectual History of the Islamicate World

, Cairo: Wizārat al-ṯaqāfa wa-l-iršād al-qawmī, 1964. Ibn Sīnā (Avicenna), Abū ʿAlī al-Ḥusayn ibn ʿAbdallāh, The Metaphysics of the Healing [= al-Šifāʾ , al-Ilāhiyyāt ], trans. Michael E. Marmura, Provo, UT : Brigham Young University Press, 2005. Ibn Sīnā (Avicenna), Abū ʿAlī al-Ḥusayn ibn ʿAbdallāh

In: Intellectual History of the Islamicate World

:25; Luke 22:30). Stage two is their dispatch, which involves four elements: (1) they are sent out to preach (as explicit in 3:14; 6:12) and to heal; (2) they are to travel with no extra clothing or resources; (3) they can accept hospitality when offered; (4) they should resolutely part ways with people who

In: Second Corinthians in the Perspective of Late Second Temple Judaism

. Jesus Tradition The Gospels are noteworthy for the many stories of women who had themselves or their child healed by Jesus. 93 A striking example is the healing of the elder woman who Jesus said deserved to be freed from her ‘infirmity’ since she was ‘a daughter of Abraham’ (Luke 13:11–17). 94 Women

In: Second Corinthians in the Perspective of Late Second Temple Judaism

under discussion here he cites by name only one book. In his description of the balādhur rasāyana (passages [23]–[32]) he notes a recipe for the same concoction found in ʿ Uyūn al-shifā ʾ (“The Wellsprings of Healing”), which he praises as “one of their important, extensive and reliable books.” Of all

In: Intellectual History of the Islamicate World

( inna al-ṭibb ʿilm yataʿarraf minhu aḥwāl badan al-insān min jihat mā yaṣiḥḥ wa-yazūl ʿan al-ṣiḥḥa, li-yuḥfaẓ al-ṣiḥḥa ḥāṣila wa-yastaraddahā zāʾila ).” 41 In the Canon , therefore, Ibn Sīnā identifies medicine as a science to heal disease whereas he defines medicine as the act of preserving health in

In: Intellectual History of the Islamicate World

بل في صفاقها.‭ 27 ‬»‬‎ Paladius in capitulo cuius principium: “designat quod ulcera uesice et renum sunt difficilis sanationis.” Dixit: “ulcus non fit in carne renum sed in sifac [ ṣifāq ] eorum ubi est urina.” About the aphorism that begins “ulcers in the bladder and kidneys heal with

In: Intellectual History of the Islamicate World

diseases ( kitāb fī al-amrāḍ al-baladiyya ). For in the book on local diseases, Hippocrates says how to recognise prevailing diseases ( al-amrāḍ al-ʿāmma ) in each locality so that one takes precaution from them and prepares remedies to heal what comes about because of them. To achieve this [aim], it is

In: Intellectual History of the Islamicate World

of help, but because of the guilt of his infidelity (in other words, it’s his own fault for not converting earlier!) 157 He is skeptical of the possibility that the infidel, given a chance at a longer life, might convert: And if it is said that he might be converted if he is healed, it should be

In: Medieval Encounters