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Brian A. Hazlett and Daniel I. Rubenstein

EXAMINATION OF THE AGONISTIC BEHAVIOUR OF THE CRAYFISH ORCONECTES VIRILIS BY CHARACTER ANALYSIS by DANIEL I. RUBENSTEIN1) and BRIAN A. HAZLETT 2) (Department of Zoology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich., USA) (With 5 Figures) ( Rec. 20-V-1973) INTRODUCTION One of the major areas of

Finn E. Sandegren

COURTSHIP DISPLAY, AGONISTIC BEHAVIOR AND SOCIAL DYNAMICS IN THE STELLER SEA LION (EUMETOPIAS JUBATUS) by FINN E. SANDEGREN 1) 2) (The Research Department, Swedish Museum of Natural History, Stockholm, Sweden) (With 5 Figures) (Acc. 3-IV-1975) INTRODUCTION The Steller sea lion Eumetopias

Heidi H. Swanson and A.P. Payne

AGONISTIC BEHAVIOUR BETWEEN PAIRS OF HAMSTERS OF THE SAME AND OPPOSITE SEX IN A NEUTRAL OBSERVATION AREA by A. P. PAYNE and HEIDI H. SWANSON1) (Department of Anatomy, University of Birmingham, England) (With 2 Figures) (Rec. 3-II-1970) The golden hamster (Mesocricetus auratus Waterhouse

Amir Sagi, Assaf Barki, Ilan Karplus and Isam Khalaila

THE INFLUENCE OF ANDROGENIC GLAND IMPLANTATION ON THE AGONISTIC BEHAVIOR OF FEMALE CRAYFISH (CHERAX QUADRICARINATUS) IN INTERACTIONS WITH MALES by ILAN KARPLUS 1,2) , AMIR SAGI 3) , ISAM KHALAILA 3) and ASSAF BARKI 1,4) ( 1 Department of Aquaculture, Institute of Animal Science, Agricultural

D.R. Fielder and C.L. Lee

AGONISTIC BEHAVIOUR AND THE DEVELOPMENT OF DOMINANCE HIERARCHIES IN THE FRESHWATER PRAWN, MACROBRACHIUM AUSTRALIENSE HOLTHUIS, 1950 (CRUSTACEA: PALAEMONIDAE) by C. L. LEE1)2) and D. R. FIELDER (Department of Zoology, The University of Queensland, St Lucia 4067, Australia) (With 1 Figure) (Acc

Barbara F. Brockway

" wooden nesting boxes. The agonistic behavior of about 80 individuals was observed. Studies were made initially on groups of the same sex; later, groups containing both sexes were observed. Birds in each group were caged together at least I or 2 months prior to study to minimize possible bias resulting

Marcelo M. Dalosto, Alexandre V. Palaoro, Sandro Santos and Juliana R. Costa

primary burrower, and Parastacus brasiliensis , a secondary burrower. Intraspecific pairs were formed, with a maximum 15% difference in carapace and chelae length within each pair. Pairs were allowed to interact for 20 min, during which they were recorded, and the agonistic behaviour was then analyzed

Joseph R. Waas

are nocturnally active on land and occupy a wide range of nesting habitats along the coastlines of New Zealand and Australia. I examined the agonistic behaviour of this species in two con- trasting nesting habitats: caves and burrows. In caves, males form clubs (3-6 individuals) and perform

Jiro Kikkawa

equal among the members of the flock and that agonistic behaviour adversely affects the energy balance of the most aggressive and most submissive members when the distribution of food is limited. If fighting is increased further, more of the top and bottom birds would suffer and selection against these

Sarah J. Wofford, Phillip M. LaPlante and Paul A. Moore

outcomes and decisions. However, numerous studies have demonstrated that male and female crustaceans use this information differently. Due to large population densities (Mather & Stein, 1993 ; Perry et al., 1997 ; Nystrom, 2002 ; Davis & Huber, 2007 ) and propensity for agonistic behaviours (Bovbjerg