Education and Society in Florentine Tuscany

Teachers, Pupils and Schools, c. 1250-1500

Series:

Robert Black

Scholarship on pre-university education in Italy during the Middle Ages and Renaissance has been dominated by studies of individual towns or by general syntheses of Italy as a whole; in contrast, this work offers not only an archival study of a region but also attempts to discern crucial local variations on a comparative basis. It documents mass literacy in the city of Florence; the school curriculum in the individual Florentine subject towns, as well as in the city of Florence itself; the decline of church education and the rise of lay schools; the development of communal schools in Florentine Tuscany up to 1400; and teachers, schools and pupils in the city of Florence during the fifteenth century.

Antony Black

reviewed. ANTONY BLACK Book Review Editor

Series:

Crofton Black

This is the first full-length study of the Heptaplus, the commentary on the creation narrative of Genesis 1 by the celebrated Italian philosopher Giovanni Pico della Mirandola. It focuses on Pico’s theory of allegory. This theory was fundamentally dissimilar to mainstream medieval and Renaissance approaches to biblical interpretation. Rather than use the standard four senses of Scripture, Pico adopted an esoteric hermeneutic stance characteristic of Neoplatonic and kabbalistic exegesis, and developed an allegorical theory based on epistemology and the idea of intellectual ascent. The exploration of this theme makes it possible not only to interpret the Heptaplus in relation to Pico’s other works, but also to assess its role as a response to the contemporary philosophical controversy surrounding the intellect.

Nicola Ferri and Nilüfer Oral

Introduction This article outlines the evolution of cooperation in fisheries management among Black Sea coastal States against the background of significant developments that occurred in the region since the Cold War period. It sheds light as to the reasons why cooperation has been undermined and

M. Black

-chilling accumulation of gibberellin in seeds of Corylus avellana L Planta (Berl.) 1976 131 135 139 Balboa-Zavala O. Dennis F.G. Abscisic acid and apple seed dormancy. J. Am. Soc. Hort. Sci. 1977 102 633 637 Bewley J.D. Negbi M. Black M. Immediate phytochrome action in lettuce seeds and its interaction with

Re-Membering the Black Atlantic

On the Poetics and Politics of Literary Memory

Series:

Lars Eckstein

The Atlantic slave trade continues to haunt the cultural memories of Africa, Europe and the Americas. There is a prevailing desire to forget: While victims of the African diaspora tried to flee the sites of trauma, enlightened Westerners preferred to be oblivious to the discomforting complicity between their enlightenment and chattel slavery. Recently, however, fiction writers have ventured to ‘re-member’ the Black Atlantic.
This book is concerned with how literature performs as memory. It sets out to chart systematically the ways in which literature and memory intersect, and offers readings of three seminal Black Atlantic novels. Each reading illustrates a particular poetic strategy of accessing the past and presents a distinct political outlook on memory. Novelists may choose to write back to texts, images or music: Caryl Phillips’s Cambridge brings together numerous fragments of slave narratives, travelogues and histories to shape a brilliant montage of long-forgotten texts. David Dabydeen’s A Harlot’s Progress approaches slavery through the gateway of paintings by William Hogarth, Sir Joshua Reynolds and J.M.W. Turner. Toni Morrison’s Beloved, finally, is steeped in black music, from spirituals and blues to the art of John Coltrane. Beyond differences in poetic strategy, moreover, the novels paradigmatically reveal distinct ideologies: their politics of memory variously promote an encompassing transcultural sense of responsibility, an aestheticist ‘creative amnesia’, and the need to preserve a collective ‘black’ identity.

Robert Black

Review Article The origins of humanism, its educational context and its early development: a review article of Ronald Witt’s ‘In the Footsteps of the Ancients’ ROBERT BLACK Ronald G. Witt’s ‘In the Footsteps of the Ancients’. The Origins of Humanism from Lovato to Bruni (Brill, Leiden Boston

Carmen Blacker

. Faculty of Oriental Studies, University of Cambridge CARMEN BLACKER

Series:

Rosalyn Black

this precarity on many aspects of young people’s lives have been described in numerous recent studies (e.g. Walsh and Black 2015 ). I don’t intend to replicate that account here. Instead, my concern is with the ways in which, in the face of this precarity, young people are increasingly encouraged to

Fiona Black

fiona c. black 110 © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2006 Biblical Interpretation 14, 1-2 Also available online – www.brill.nl A MISERABLE FEAST: DISHING UP THE BIBLICAL BODY IN THE COOK, THE THIEF, HIS WIFE AND HER LOVER FIONA C. BLACK Mount Allison University Peter Greenaway’s films generally