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Naoko Shimazu

say, there were a myriad of others, be they delegates, journalists, or local townspeople, who were present at the conference either officially or unofficially. In this complex multi-layered conference space, “sociability” worked like a social glue that brought people together and generated a semblance

Art et littérature

Le voyage entre texte et image

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Edited by Jean-Loup Korzilius

Les voyages relatés dans le présent volume sont en effet fortement associés aux dimensions visuelle et scripturale en ce qu’ils se fondent sur, engendrent ou passent par l’écriture et/ou la figuration, que ce soit simultanément ou consécutivement : le voyage vers des contrées mystérieuses et déroutantes de Marco Polo, dans l’hypermonde, une campagne militaire…, le voyage formateur…, celui entrepris pour raisons pratiques ou intellectuelles…, pour s’adonner à une nostalgie improbable …, au rêve d’ une communauté idéale…, ou pour se confronter à l’étrangeté du lieu visité.
En considérant les échanges variés et serrés entre les deux modes d’expression, le rapport texte/image apparaît dans la perspective du voyage comme la métaphore de l’expérience même du voyage au sens profond du terme.
Cet aspect (trans)formateur du voyage est donc au cœur du présent recueil (…) Comme dans la vie de ces voyageurs, un réseau nouveau, invisible se crée sous l’effet du déplacement entre la lettre et la forme, entre ce qui était au départ inaccessible, ignoré ou impensable et le connu ou convenu…
Il ne reste plus qu’ à souhaiter qu’en voyageant d’un texte à l’autre, d’une illustration à l’autre, d’une ambiance historique et imaginaire à l’autre, le lecteur saisisse, lui aussi, l’occasion de circuler entre les diverses configurations du dialogue visuel/scriptural… (et) entre l’histoire, l’histoire de la littérature, de l’art, la littérature comparée et l’esthétique graphique.

Marius Flothuis

Mozart’s Piano Concertos, especially those composed during the years 1784-’91, are still held in high esteem, two centuries later, by both amateur music-lovers and professional musicians. Strangely enough, only very few comprehensive studies exist on this remarkable section of Mozart’s output.
The present study, first published in German in a slightly abridged form, deals with Mozart’s evolution as a composer of piano concertos; sheds light on the connections between the concertos and other fields of creative activity, as well as on those with other composers of his time. Finally, attention is paid to problems of performance practice.
The author, born in 1914, emeritus professor of Utrecht University and former chairman of the Zentralinstitut für Mozart-Forschung, Salzburg, has been involved with the subject of Mozart’s concertos for about 60 years.

Bridging Humanities

Platform for Alternatives Methodologies

Edited by Mirjam de Bruijn

Bridging Humanities – Platform for Alternatives Methodologies is a peer reviewed, interdisciplinary and multi-area online publication. The scope of Bridging Humanities is to publish original projects that include visuals and other kinds of digital sources as an integral part of the publication. Bridging Humanities includes original research from the humanities intended as an open field that is connected with other disciplines. Each publication is an interactive online space in which text and visuals are used as sources to produce and present knowledge from their field. Using this new format, Bridging Humanities encourages researchers to experiment with new methodologies for publication in which the importance of the digital is recognized as an integral part of the publication and research process. The website publishes at least one new project per year and is hosted externally: www.bridginghumanities.com

Orientations

Space / Time / Image / Word

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Edited by Claus Clüver, Véronique Plesch and Leo H. Hoek

Based on papers presented at the Fifth Triennial Conference of the International Association of Word and Image Studies (IAWIS/AERTI) held in 2002 in Hamburg, the twenty-two essays in this volume cover a wide array of intermedial relations and a great variety of media, from medieval architecture to interactive digital art. They have been arranged in sections labeled “History and Identity,” “Cultural Memory,” “Texts and Photographs: Cultural Anthropology and Cultural Memory,” “Mixed-Media Texts: Cartography in Contemporary Art and Fiction,” “Mixed-Media Texts: ‘Yellow-Cover Books’, Artists' Books, and Comics,” “Intermedia Texts: Logotypes,” and “Space, Spatialization, Virtual Space.” Displaying a range of methods and interests, these contributions by scholars from Europe, the United States, and South America working in different disciplines confirm the impression voiced by IAWIS president Charlotte Schoell-Glass in her introduction that “the influence of Visual and Cultural Studies has changed the outlook of many who study the interactions of texts and images”.

Ampere A. Tseng

Sūtra (地藏菩薩本愿經), and the Mahayana Brahmajāla Sūtra . More details on these vegetarian pledges can be found in a study presented by Tseng (2017: 99, 100). Moreover, various vegetarian feasts are conducted at a wide range of Buddhist celebrations, dharma assemblies, and other occasions. These include

A Nation of Victims?

Representations of German Wartime Suffering from 1945 to the Present

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Edited by Helmut Schmitz

The re-emergence of the issue of wartime suffering to the fore of German public discourse represents the greatest shift in German memory culture since the Historikerstreit of the 1980s. The (international) attention and debates triggered by, for example, W.G. Sebald’s Luftkrieg und Literatur, Günter Grass’s Im Krebsgang, Jörg Friedrich’s Der Brand testify to a change in focus away from the victims of National Socialism to the traumatic experience of the ‘perpetrator collective’ and its legacies. The volume brings together German, English and Israeli literary and film scholars and historians addressing issues surrounding the representation of German wartime suffering from the immediate post-war period to the present in literature, film and public commemorative discourse. Split into four sections, the volume discusses the representation of Germans as victims in post-war literature and film, the current memory politics of the Bund der Vertriebenen, the public commemoration of the air raids on Hamburg and Dresden and their representation in film, photography, historiography and literature, the impact and reception of W.G. Sebald’s Luftkrieg und Literatur, the representation of flight and expulsion in contemporary writing, the problem of empathy in representations of Germans as victims and the representation of suffering and National Socialism in Oliver Hirschbiegel’s film Der Untergang.

Edited by Katie Barclay, Andrew Lynch and Giovanni Tarantino

EHCS is dedicated to understanding the emotions as culturally and temporally-situated phenomena, and to exploring the role of emotion in shaping human experience and action by individuals, groups, societies and cultures.

EHCS welcomes theoretically-informed work from a range of historical, cultural and social domains. The journal aims to illuminate (1) the ways emotion is conceptualized and understood in different temporal or cultural settings, from antiquity to the present, and across the globe; (2) the impact of emotion on human action and in processes of change; and (3) the influence of emotional legacies from the past on current social, cultural and political practices.

EHCS is interested in multidisciplinary approaches (both qualitative and quantitative), from history, art, literature, languages, music, politics, sociology, cognitive sciences, cultural studies, environmental humanities, religious studies, linguistics, philosophy, psychology, and related disciplines. The journal also invites papers that interrogate the methodological and critical problems of exploring emotions in historical, cultural and social contexts, and the relation between past and present in the study of feelings, passions, sentiments, emotions and affects. Finally, Emotions also accepts theoretically-informed and reflective scholarship that explores how scholars access, uncover, construct and engage with emotions in their own scholarly practice.

Following an initial review process by the editors, EHCS sends acceptable submissions to two expert independent readers outside the author’s home institution, employing a double-blind review procedure.

EHCS is published on behalf of the Society for the History of Emotions.

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Hisakazu Inagaki and J. Nelson Jennings

Philosophical Theology and East-West Dialogue is a unique philosophical and theological analysis of certain key interactions between Eastern and Western thinkers. The book on the one hand contrasts general traits of Eastern, Buddhist thought and Western, Greek thought. However, in doing so it focuses on influential philosophers and theologians who manifest particular instances of wider issues. The result is a careful examination of basic questions that offers both broad implications and concrete specificity in its approach.
The book itself is an instance of East-West dialogue. Independently of each other both authors had previously engaged in serious cross-cultural studies. The Japanese Inagaki had researched Western science and philosophy, then written in Japanese comparative studies of Japanese thought. The North American Jennings had researched Japanese theology. They brought these backgrounds together, dialoguing with each other until the present study emerged.
Several creative Japanese thinkers, as well as important Westerners, are taken up. The study follows the lead of many Eastern impulses, but it also critically utilizes Western methods. Contemporary thinking on religious plurality is carefully examined. This new study is a must for those interested in philosophy and theology in general, and East-West interaction in particular.

Memories and Representations of War

The Case of World War I and World War II

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Edited by Elena Lamberti and Vita Fortunati

The contributors to the present volume approach World War I and World War II as complex and intertwined crossroads leading to the definition of the new European (and world) reality, and deeply pervading the making of the twentieth century. These scholars belong to different yet complementary areas of research – history, literature, cinema, art history; they come from various national realities and discuss questions related to Italy, Britain, Germany, Poland, Spain, at times introducing a comparison between European and North American memories of the two World War experiences. These scholars are all guided by the same principle: to encourage the establishment of an interdisciplinary and trans-national dialogue in order to work out new approaches capable of integrating and acknowledging different or even opposing ways to perceive and interpret the same historical phenomenon. While assessing the way the memories of the two World Wars have been readjusted each time in relation to the evolving international historical setting and through various mediators of memory (cinema, literature, art and monuments), the various essays contribute to unveil a cultural panorama inhabited by contrasting memories and by divided memories not to emphasise divisions, but to acknowledge the ethical need for a truly shared act of reconciliation.