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Art and Value

Art’s Economic Exceptionalism in Classical, Neoclassical and Marxist Economics

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Dave Beech

Art and Value is the first comprehensive analysis of art's political economy throughout classical, neoclassical and Marxist economics. It provides a critical-historical survey of the theories of art's economic exceptionalism, of art as a merit good, and of the theories of art's commodification, the culture industry and real subsumption.
Key debates on the economics of art, from the high prices artworks fetch at auction, to the controversies over public subsidy of the arts, the 'cost disease' of artistic production, and neoliberal and post-Marxist theories of art's incorporation into capitalism, are examined in detail.
Subjecting mainstream and Marxist theories of art's economics to an exacting critique, the book concludes with a new Marxist theory of art's economic exceptionalism.

The “Greek Crisis” in Europe

Race, Class and Politics

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Yiannis Mylonas

The “Greek Crisis” in Europe: Race, Class and Politics, critically analyses the publicity of the Greek debt crisis, by studying Greek, Danish and German mainstream media during the crisis’ early years (2009-2015). Mass media everywhere reproduced a sensualistic “Greek crisis” spectacle, while iterating neoliberal and occidentalist ideological myths. Overall, the Greek people were deemed guilty of a systemic crisis, supposedly enjoying lavish lifestyles on the EU’s expense. Using concrete examples, the study foregrounds neoorientalist, neoracist and classist stereotypes deployed in the construction and media coverage of the Greek crisis. These media practices are connected to the “soft politics” of the crisis, which produce public consensus over neoliberal reforms such as austerity and privatizations, and secure debt repayment from democratic interventions.

Body Show/s

Australian viewings of live performance

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Edited by Peta Tait

Body Show/s: Australian Viewings of Live Performance asks: in what ways do physical bodies in live performance present vital and compelling expressions of ideas?
This collection contains critical analyses of cultural spectacle and social identity by eighteen major Australian scholars and practitioners. It discusses and describes bodies in contemporary performance, theatre, visual art and dance; in circus and ethnographic shows; in performance training, butoh and wrestling; at gay and lesbian dance parties; and in relation to digital images. It explores historical and theoretical issues of gender and postcoloniality, technology, and the location of bodies in architectural, social and virtual spaces.
Artistes and groups discussed include Sydney Front, Open City, The Performance Space, Meryl Tankard’s Australian Dance Theatre, Chrissie Parrott, the Bell Shakespeare Company, Tess De Quincey, Yumi Umiumare, Gilgul Theatre, Lyndal Jones, Stelarc, Death Defying Theatre, colonial circus, ethnographic displays, the horse as performer, and wrestling legends Gorgeous George and Ravishing Ricky Rude.

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Charlène Deharbe

Tout semble opposer le théâtre au récit de soi. Le premier se rattache aux arts du spectacle, tandis que le second relève de l’intime. Genre littéraire emblématique du XVIIIe siècle, le roman-mémoires invite à dépasser cette opposition. S’il place l’expérience vécue au cœur de son écriture, il s’approprie également le langage de la scène comique ou tragique au profit d’une fiction de l’intériorité. Ce livre montre ce que le roman-mémoires doit au théâtre, en étudiant comment son écriture s’élabore à partir de différents emprunts et procédés caractéristiques de la scène. En s’inventant au sein d’une culture dominée par le goût du spectacle, ce genre lègue ainsi à la littérature à venir les éléments constitutifs d’un langage de l’intime.

Theatre and fictional memoir are supposedly opposites: the former has to do with the performing arts, while the latter focuses on the intimate side of life. A literary genre emblematic of the eighteenth century, fictional memoir invites readers to move beyond this assumption. Although lived experience is at the heart of the memoir, such fiction also appropriates the language of comedy or tragedy for the benefit of a novel of interiority. This book highlights fictional memoir’s debt to the theatre, while examining how its writing developed based on various borrowings and processes characteristic of the stage. By self-inventing within a culture dominated by enthusiasm for stage performance, this genre thereby endowed future literature with the constitutive elements of a language of the intimate.

Philologie et théâtre

Traduire, commenter, interpréter le théâtre antique en Europe (XVe – XVIIIe siècle)

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Edited by Véronique Lochert and Zoé Schweitzer

Après avoir été longtemps réduites à des recueils de sentences morales ou à des modèles rhétoriques, les pièces des grands dramaturges grecs et latins reconquièrent, à la fin du XVe siècle, une part importante de leur théâtralité. Le travail des traducteurs, situé au carrefour de l’explication philologique et de l’appropriation culturelle, est un élément essentiel de ce renouveau.
Le théâtre occupe une place centrale parmi les œuvres antiques éditées et commentées par les Renaissants, et dans leurs réflexions sur l’Antiquité, mais pose de nombreux problèmes d’interprétation. Comment lire ces textes destinés à la scène et dont une pleine compréhension engage le ressaisissement d’un monde révolu?
Les contributions réunies dans ce volume explorent la diversité des pratiques européennes du XVe au XVIIIe siècle afin de mieux mettre en valeur le rôle joué par la traduction dans le nouveau statut du texte dramatique. Elles éclairent la dimension herméneutique de la traduction, son apport à la réflexion théorique sur le théâtre et la place du spectacle antique dans la Querelle des Anciens et des Modernes.

The Theater of Transformation

Postmodernism in American Drama

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Kerstin Schmidt

The Theater of Transformation: Postmodernism in American Drama offers a fresh and innovative reading of the contemporary experimental American theater scene and navigates through the contested and contentious relationship between postmodernism and contemporary drama. This book addresses gender and class as well as racial issues in the context of a theoretical discussion of dramatic texts, textuality, and performance. Transformation is contemporary drama's answer to the questions of postmodernism and a major technique in the development of a postmodern language for the stage. In order to demonstrate the multi-faceted nature of the postmodern theater of transformation, this study draws on a wide range of plays: from early experimental plays of the 1960s by Jean-Claude van Itallie through feminist plays by Megan Terry and Rochelle Owens to more recent drama by the African-American playwright Suzan-Lori Parks.
The Theater of Transformation: Postmodernism in American Drama is written for anyone interested in contemporary American drama and theater as well as in postmodernism and contemporary literary theory. It appeals even more broadly to a readership intrigued by the ubiquitous aspects of popular culture, by feminism and ethnicity, and by issues pertaining to the so-called 'society of spectacle' and the study of contemporary media.

Neo-Victorian Tropes of Trauma

The Politics of Bearing After-Witness to Nineteenth-Century Suffering

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Edited by Marie-Luise Kohlke and Christian Gutleben

This collection constitutes the first volume in Rodopi’s Neo-Victorian Series, which explores the prevalent but often problematic re-vision of the long nineteenth century in contemporary culture. Here is presented for the first time an extended analysis of the conjunction of neo-Victorian fiction and trauma discourse, highlighting the significant interventions in collective memory staged by the belated aesthetic working-through of historical catastrophes, as well as their lingering traces in the present. The neo-Victorian’s privileging of marginalised voices and its contestation of master-narratives of historical progress construct a patchwork of competing but equally legitimate versions of the past, highlighting on-going crises of existential extremity, truth and meaning, nationhood and subjectivity. This volume will be of interest to both researchers and students of the growing field of neo-Victorian studies, as well as scholars in memory studies, trauma theory, ethics, and heritage studies. It interrogates the ideological processes of commemoration and forgetting and queries how the suffering of cultural and temporal others should best be represented, so as to resist the temptations of exploitative appropriation and voyeuristic spectacle. Such precarious negotiations foreground a central paradox: the ethical imperative to bear after-witness to history’s silenced victims in the face of the potential unrepresentability of extreme suffering.

Deep hiStories

Gender and Colonialism in Southern Africa

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Edited by Wendy Woodward, Patricia Hayes and Gary Minkley

Deep hiStories represents the first substantial publication on gender and colonialism in Southern Africa in recent years, and suggests methodological ways forward for a post-apartheid and postcolonial generation of scholars. The volume’s theorizing, which is based on Southern African regional material, is certain to impact on international debates on gender – debates which have shifted from earlier feminisms towards theorizations which include sexual difference, subjectivities, colonial (and postcolonial) discourses and the politics of representation. Deep hiStories goes beyond the dichotomies which have largely characterized the discussion of women and gender in Africa, and explores alternative models of interpretation such as ‘genealogies of voice’. These ‘genealogies’ transcend the conventional binaries of visibility and invisibility, speaking and silence. Works covering South Africa from the eighteenth to the twentieth century and Zimbabwe, Namibia and Cameroon in the twentieth include:
• Colonial readings of Foucault
• Ideologies of domesticity
• Torture and testimony of slave women
• Women as missionary targets
• Gender and the public sphere
• Race, science and spectacle
• Male nursing on mines
• Infanticide, insanity and social control
• Fertility and the postcolonial state
• Literary reconstructions of the past
• Gender-blending and code-switching
• De/colonizing the queer
The collection includes diverse research on the body in Southern Africa for the first time. It brings new subtleties to the ongoing debates on culture, civility and sexuality, dealing centrally with constructions of race and whiteness in history and literature. It is an important resource for teachers and students of gender and colonial studies.

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Edited by Larissa Tracy and Kelly DeVries

The spectacle of the wounded body figured prominently in the Middle Ages, from images of Christ’s wounds on the cross, to the ripped and torn bodies of tortured saints who miraculously heal through divine intervention, to graphic accounts of battlefield and tournament wounds—evidence of which survives in the archaeological record—and literary episodes of fatal (or not so fatal) wounds. This volume offers a comprehensive look at the complexity of wounding and wound repair in medieval literature and culture, bringing together essays from a wide range of sources and disciplines including arms and armaments, military history, medical history, literature, art history, hagiography, and archaeology across medieval and early modern Europe.
Contributors are Stephen Atkinson, Debby Banham, Albrecht Classen, Joshua Easterling, Charlene M. Eska, Carmel Ferragud, M.R. Geldof, Elina Gertsman, Barbara A. Goodman, Máire Johnson, Rachel E. Kellett, Ilana Krug, Virginia Langum, Michael Livingston, Iain A. MacInnes, Timothy May, Vibeke Olson, Salvador Ryan, William Sayers, Patricia Skinner, Alicia Spencer-Hall, Wendy J. Turner, Christine Voth, and Robert C. Woosnam-Savage.

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Edited by Christopher Balme and Gordon Collier

During the same period in which Derek Walcott was pouring immense physical, emotional, and logistical resources into the foundation of a viable first-rate West Indian theatre company and continuing to write his inimitable poetry, he was also busy writing newspaper reviews, chiefly for the Trinidad Guardian. His prodigious reviewing activity extended far beyond those areas with which one might most readily associate his interests and convictions. As Gordon Rohlehr once presciently observed, “If one wants to see a quotidian workaday Walcott, one should go back to [his] well over five hundred articles, essays and reviews on painting, cinema, calypso, carnival, drama and literature,” articles which “reveal a rich, various, witty and scrupulous intelligence in which generous humour counterpoints acerbity.” These articles capture the vitality of Caribbean culture and shed additional light on the aesthetic preoccupations expressed in Walcott’s essays published in journals. The editors have examined the corpus of Walcott’s journalistic activity from its beginnings in 1950 to its peak in the early 1970s, and have made a generous selection of material from the Guardian, along with occasional pieces from such sources as Public Opinion (Kingston) and The Voice of St. Lucia (Castries). The articles in Volume 2 are organized as follows: the performing arts; general surveys of anglophone Caribbean drama, theatre, and society; festivals, theatre companies, and productions; British and American drama; dance and music theatre; Carnival and calypso; and cinema screenings in Trinidad. Volume 2 additionally contains an exhaustive annotated and cross-referenced chronological bibliography of Walcott’s journalism up to 1990. The co-editor Christopher Balme has written a searching introductory essay on a central theme – here, a survey of West Indian theatre and Walcott’s engagement with it, particularly the idea of a ‘National Theatre’, coupled with an illustrative discussion of the playwright’s seminal dramatic spectacle Drums and Colours.