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during the 1920s).3 For these and many other reasons, Parnakh is deserving of scholarly scrutiny. As an expert in the discipline of dance, Pamakh was well aware that the eccentric flashes and amazing fluctuations of the body on stage or in any spectacle that ruptured the classical schemas derived not

In: Experiment

- ning of the twentieth century, so popular that dancers from other countries took Russian stage names to share in the fame. The spectacle and inventive- ness of Sergei Diaghilev's Ballets Russes, for example, still evoke astonish- ment and delight and are the frequent subject of research and

In: Experiment

Soviet ideas.4This view is largely in keeping with that of Jean Cocteau who castigated Massine for "turning something as great as the Russian Revolution into a cotillion- like spectacle within the intellectual grasp of ladies who pay six thousand francs for a box."5 Since the 1980s however, the growing

In: Experiment

also reveal his concept of the religious theater. The director is encouraged to exercise a great sense of measure in the various elements of the spectacle and to operate with a single, uniform conception, prompted by the knowledge that "Like flashes of lightning, the elements of opposition and

In: Experiment

Unwin, 1973), p. 186. 38. �d., p. 218 sage in the choreography which served to enhance the overall unity of the visual spectacle: One day Gabo left the scenic studio where he worked and where Massine had asked if he might sometirnes come and practise in solitude, to visit the rehersal room upstairs. He

In: Experiment

immediately he began to develop his own visual and choreographic dance system. Much under the influence of Delsarte and Duncan, he formulated a theory of the plas- tic arts, arguing that plastic art or the art of movement was not only a de- terminant in the exterior beauty of a theatrical spectacle, but also

In: Experiment

orchestra itself created the kinesthetic spectacle; each performer mani- fested a spirited and boisterous personality with a distinct movement vo- cabulary of waves, kicks, flutters, nods, head shakes, bows, foot taps, winks, shoulder turns, and shuffles. For Parnakh, the seemingly impro- vised gestures of

In: Experiment

life in art arises only from the pure contact between rhythm and meter, since rhythm is a centrifugal, mysterious and reli- gious force, while meter is a cetripetal earthly force. Rhythm rips the spectacle out of everyday life and meter gives [it) new artificial life.15 Ferdinandov, Shershenevich, and

In: Experiment

reality, presenting only what "represents" reality for a given spectacle. We have indicated above that, in a cultural museum, the exhibits "act" the way ac- tors play out in the theater. From this perspective, museum exhibits not only "represent" reality, but also are reality themselves. True, actors and

In: Experiment

business! And another thing, a Jew shouldn't make such a spectacle of himself. That only stirs up anti-Semitism. Since the ninth of November we haven't had law and order in this country."20 In another piece called "Herr Wendriner Gives a Dinner Party," Tucholsky satirized Wendriner's lack of self

In: Experiment