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Christopher Reading and Gabriela Jofré

in the conservation of some species, given current concerns about widespread snake declines (Reading et al., 2010 ). The aims of the study reported here were to investigate the diet of the Smooth snake ( Coronella austriaca ) in relation to body size and to determine the potential impact any

Jakob Parzefall, Rüdiger Riesch, Ingo Schlupp and Martin Plath

Female choice for large body size in the cave molly, Poecilia mexicana (Poeciliidae, Teleostei): influence of species- and sex-specific cues Martin Plath 1,2,3) , Ingo Schlupp 1) , Jakob Parzefall 4) & Rüdiger Riesch 1) ( 1 Department of Zoology, University of Oklahoma, 730 Van Vleet Oval

Bhagyashri Shanbhag, Srinivas Saidapur and Rajkumar Radder

Animal Biology , Vol. 56, No. 3, pp. 311-321 (2006)  Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2006. Also available online - www.brill.nl Big boys on top: effects of body size, sex and reproductive state on perching behaviour in the tropical rock dragon, Psammophilus dorsalis RAJKUMAR S. RADDER

Matthew Lovern and Thomas Jenssen

THE EFFECTS OF CONTEXT, SEX, AND BODY SIZE ON STAGED SOCIAL INTERACTIONS IN JUVENILE MALE AND FEMALE GREEN ANOLES (ANOLIS CAROLINENSIS) by MATTHEW B. LOVERN 1,2) and THOMAS A. JENSSEN 3) (Biology Department, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061, USA) (Acc. 20-VI-2001) Summary We documented

Arne Ø. Mooers and Dolph Schluter

How do traits change through time and with speciation? We present a simple and generally applicable method for comparing various models of the macroevolution of traits within a maximum likelihood framework. We illustrate four such models: 1) variance among species accumulates in direct proportion to time separating them (gradual model); 2) variation accumulates with the number of speciation events separating them (speciational model); 3) differences between species are unrelated to phylogenetic relatedness (pitchfork model); and 4) a free model where the trait evolves at its own idiosyncratic rate among lineages. Using species-specific body size, we compare the four models across two data sets: twenty-one clades of vertebrate species, and two clades of bird families. For the twenty-one vertebrate trees, the pitchfork model is most successful, though not significantly, and the most successful by far for the youngest clades. The speciational model seems to be preferred for older clades. For both clades of bird families, the speciational model offers the best fit to family-level body size evolution. However, the pitchfork model does much worse for one clade than for the other, suggesting a difference in the relationship between diversification and body-size evolution in the two groups. These examples highlight some possibilities afforded by this simple approach.

David J. Thompson

HERITABILITY FOR BODY SIZE IN THE ISOPOD ASELLUS AQUATICUS (L.) BY DAVID J. THOMPSON Department of Zoology, The University, P.O. Box 147, Liverpool L69 3BX, U.K. INTRODUCTION Ridley & Thompson (1979) showed that body size was intimately associated with reproductive success in Asellus aquaticus

Daichi Arima, Atsushi Yamaguchi, Yoshiyuki Abe, Kohei Matsuno, Rui Saito, Hiroki Asami, Hiroshi Shimada and Ichiro Imai

INTRODUCTION For planktonic copepods, body size is expressed as the total length or the prosome length (PL), and the oil sac is quantified by means of the oil sac volume (OSV). These are two of the easiest to measure variables for assessing population structure. Regarding PL, the total egg

Seiichi Mori and Masaki Ishikawa

effects of male size and female size on the probability of mating success between populations. Keywords : mating success, allopatric populations, courtship behaviors, body size. Introduction Some Japanese researchers have investigated the morphological and ecolog- ical variability of threespine

Aurelio Ramírez-Bautista, Laurie Vitt, Alejandra Ramírez-Hernández, Fernando Mendoza Quijano and Geoffrey Smith

origin. Keywords : body size, lizard, Mexico, reproductive biology. Introduction Formulation and testing of hypotheses explain- ing the evolution of life history traits of lizards requires descriptive studies on reproduction, es- pecially species from lesser known taxa. We add to the existing data on

Dennis Hasselquist, Bengt Hansson and Júlio Neto

variable (body size) using principal component analysis (compo- nent scores: wing = 0.748; tarsus = 0.786; bill = 0.654). We analysed the influence of several factors on the occurrence of extra-pair young with generalized linear mixed models (GLMM; Bolker et al., 2008), with logit- link function and