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(code of Jewish law). Recently, it has been argued by Shuchat that the GRA’s messianic activism extended virtually to his entire school, claiming that its proponents viewed the unprecedented nadir of talmud torah as a sign of the proto-apocalyptic distress represent- ing the “birth pangs” of the

In: The Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy

Mark for this reference. The story (but not the lesson attached to it) is based on a Talmudic narrative on the yetzer , in b. Shabb. 156b. 2 The term yetzer (from the biblical root רצי , “to create, creature”) has been translated in numerous ways: “inclination,” “tendency,” “disposition,” “instinct

In: The Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy

. Megillah 3:8, 74b; Deut. Rabbah 4:1, 8:1, 11:6; and Massekhet Sofrim 12:3-4, and 14:1, ed. M. Higger, pp. 226--8 and 251£., along with notes thereto. 12 See Sefer Ha-Manhig 1:42 with sources in n. 62; and Ginzberg, A Commentary on the Palestinian Talmud 3:242 along with Liebreich, "The Pesuke De

In: The Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy

possibility is seen by the Talmud as being precisely the error of King Solomon, the wisest of humans, who thought he was even wiser than the divine author of the Torah. Rabbi Isaac said: Why were the reasons of the Torah (ra'amei torah) not [usually] revealed? It is because in the case of rwo scriptural laws

In: The Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy

, Michael Fishbane argues against a common tendency to deny the mythic aspects of ancient Judaism. 1 Rabbinic Judaism, he shows, preserves and fashions striking examples of mythopoesis. Among the sources he cites as evidence are talmudic legends regarding divine sorrow and a liturgical poem (Piyyut) by the

In: The Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy

Israel maintain such a relationship which is very well expressed in the concept of the “biblical-talmudical”. The two entities of the metonymy stem from the same notional background in which they both lie. Jews are the historical descendants of the biblical Israel, keeping its religion and its common

In: The Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy

these versions, in any event, can be regarded as identi- cal with the early third-century compilation ascribed in talmudic tradition to the work of Judah the Patriarch. Moreover, attempts to reconstruct "early Mishnahs" or the "original Mishnah of Rabbi Judah the Patriarch" have been unsuccessful

In: The Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy

According to Ta-Shema, Ashkenazi halakhic literature is devoid of the impact of philosophy. Likewise, Ashkenazi halakhic decisors and talmudic commentators oppose categorically the employment of 1 I thank Prof. Zev Harvey, Prof. Daniel Lasker, Dr. Aviram Ravitsky, and Dr. Adiel Kadari for reviewing the

In: The Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy

, political, and spiritual matters, including issues related to kabbalistic practices of the new hasidim and threats they were posing to traditional rabbinic culture. Students from both Eastern and Western Europe were also drawn to Landau’s famed yeshiva (talmudic academy), probably enabling him both to stay

In: The Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy

’ signi fi cant Franco-German allegiances. Rashi plays at least as great a role in the Commentary on the Torah as Ibn Ezra, and his and Tosa fi sts’ comments provide the central basis for Nahmanides’ Talmudic com- mentaries. The late Professor Twersky reminded us that Nahmanides played a leading role in

In: The Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy