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Amber Anna Colvin

In recent years the study of celebrity, of what constitutes fame, and how that fame is controlled and performed, has become an area of intense scholarly interest. This is due in part to the increased emphasis on social and cultural history and the presence of new and innovative sources, both of which have created new and exciting areas of study. The growing importance and recognition of the celebrity phenomenon has created a field that is both currently rich in literature and has the room for continued scholarship. The works in this volume address debates on the concept of celebrity, including the modernity of celebrity, the importance of the celebrity-audience relationship and the question of who controls celebrity personas. How, in essence, do celebrities “do fame?” This question is at the centre of this book, with the pieces included addressing this idea across a variety of academic disciplines, time periods, and methodological approaches.

Edited by Nuria Rodríguez Ortega, Fátima Díez-Platas and Seppo Kuivakari

The articles comprised in this anthology are attempting to discuss the rapid change of digital media technologies and the way they impetus our understanding of history and memory. History should not be regarded only as an object of research. It is also a subject, performing and registering agency. The aim of the articles will not be to cover the whole range of mediated histories, but to claim fresh insights for debate and discovery in terms of digital memories. In this sense, contributions for this volume will leave the “doors of perception” (Aldous Huxley) wide open and sketch the impact of media to different cultural practices, identity work and preservation of history, as well as the examination of it. Likewise, divergence of the papers at hand indicates that the concept “digital” ought to be recognized as institutional practices, methodological tools, or as content providers for memories.

Journal of Applied Animal Ethics Research

Ethics for Animal Welfare, Veterinary Medicine, and Conservation

Edited by Bernard Rollin and Barbara de Mori

The Journal of Applied Animal Ethics Research is an international and interdisciplinary scientific publication. It publishes the results of original peer-reviewed research, technical studies, and reviews that bring to the light the ethical issues involved in all dimensions of animal welfare, ranging from theoretical to applied contributions. Emphasis is placed on research that explores practical ethical issues related to animal care and management in veterinary medicine, conservation, companion and laboratory animals, animals involved in agriculture, sport, applied ethology and welfare science. The journal also publishes papers that examine and discuss ethical frames, tools and methodologies applied to moral issues in the human/animal relationship.

Edited by Nate Hinerman and Holly Lynn Baumgartner

From the ridicule of Emo culture on YouTube to the minute joys of the Happy Hour Trolley in an Australian palliative care setting, responses to suffering and death range from avoidance to eradication. Blunt Traumas thoughtfully engages these topics with compassion and brutal honesty. Contributors across the spectrum of professions using a variety of methodologies, including case studies, fieldwork, systematic philosophy, and historical and textual analysis all respond to the orienting question: ‘How does culture impact, co-create, and/or produce suffering?’ Their inter- and multi-disciplinary perspectives are divided into two sections. The first, ‘Public Perceptions of Death, Dying, and Suffering’ closely examines human interactions with and performance of technologies of suffering from wireless to religious, dead baby bloggers to wounded warriors. The second half of the book focuses on the ‘The Sufferer’s Right to Choose’, whether that concerns end-of-life decisions, medical technologies, or narratives of self. Together, these chapters provide greater intelligibility on and provocative discussions about the oft ignored or ‘buried’ discourses of suffering and dying.

Word and Music Studies: Defining the Field

Proceedings of the First International Conference on Word and Music Studies at Graz, 1997

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Edited by Walter Bernhart, Steven Paul Scher and Werner Wolf

The nineteen interdisciplinary essays assembled in WORD AND MUSIC STUDIES I were first presented in 1997 at the founding conference of the International Association for Word and Music Studies (WMA) in Graz, Austria. Diverse in subject matter, theoretical orientation, critical approach, and interpretive strategy, they share a keen scholarly interest in contemporary word-music reflection. Registering the impact of cultural studies on word-music relations, as manifested in the 'new musicology' and other 'historicist' approaches, the volume aims to assess the entire field of word and music studies, to define its subject, objectives, and methodology and to describe the field's state of the art. Within the broader context of generic, structural, performative, and ideological considerations concerning the manifold interrelations between literature and music, contributors explore wide-ranging topics, such as the vexing question of terminology (e.g. 'word and music', 'melopoetics', 'interart', 'intermedial', 'transmedial'); inquiry into the meaning, narrative potential, and verbalization of music; analysis of texted music (the Lied and opera) and instrumental music; and discussion of individual issues (e.g. 'ekphrasis', 'musicalization of fiction', 'word music', and 'verbal music') and interart loanwords (e.g. 'narrativity', 'counterpoint', and 'leitmotif').

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Catriona Firth

For decades postwar Austrian literature has been measured against and moulded into a series of generic categories and grand cultural narratives, from nostalgic ‘restoration’ literature of the 1950s through the socially critical ‘anti- Heimat’ novel to recent literary reckonings with Austria’s Nazi past. Peering through the lens of film adaptation, this book rattles the generic shackles imposed by literary history and provides an entirely new critical perspective on Austrian literature. Its original methodological approach challenges the primacy of written sources in existing scholarship and uses the distortions generated by the shift in medium as a productive starting point for literary analysis. Five case studies approach canonical texts in post-war Austrian literature by Gerhard Fritsch, Franz Innerhofer, Gerhard Roth, Elfriede Jelinek, and Robert Schindel, through close readings of their cinematic adaptations, concentrating on key areas of narratological concern: plot, narrative perspective, authorship, and post-modern ontologies. Setting the texts within the historical, cultural and political discourses that define the ‘Alpine Republic’, this study investigates fundamental aspects of Austrian national identity, such as its Habsburg and National Socialist legacies.

Deep hiStories

Gender and Colonialism in Southern Africa

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Edited by Wendy Woodward, Patricia Hayes and Gary Minkley

Deep hiStories represents the first substantial publication on gender and colonialism in Southern Africa in recent years, and suggests methodological ways forward for a post-apartheid and postcolonial generation of scholars. The volume’s theorizing, which is based on Southern African regional material, is certain to impact on international debates on gender – debates which have shifted from earlier feminisms towards theorizations which include sexual difference, subjectivities, colonial (and postcolonial) discourses and the politics of representation. Deep hiStories goes beyond the dichotomies which have largely characterized the discussion of women and gender in Africa, and explores alternative models of interpretation such as ‘genealogies of voice’. These ‘genealogies’ transcend the conventional binaries of visibility and invisibility, speaking and silence. Works covering South Africa from the eighteenth to the twentieth century and Zimbabwe, Namibia and Cameroon in the twentieth include:
• Colonial readings of Foucault
• Ideologies of domesticity
• Torture and testimony of slave women
• Women as missionary targets
• Gender and the public sphere
• Race, science and spectacle
• Male nursing on mines
• Infanticide, insanity and social control
• Fertility and the postcolonial state
• Literary reconstructions of the past
• Gender-blending and code-switching
• De/colonizing the queer
The collection includes diverse research on the body in Southern Africa for the first time. It brings new subtleties to the ongoing debates on culture, civility and sexuality, dealing centrally with constructions of race and whiteness in history and literature. It is an important resource for teachers and students of gender and colonial studies.

Oliver Bray and Peter Bray

This chapter invites discussion of the uncomfortable, but nonetheless delightful, differences and similarities of interpretation of the discipline-specific methodologies of performance and therapy. Using three case studies we consider the performance of trauma: as the replication of experience; its affect on the maker, the performer, and the audience of the work; and questions that touch upon power, perception, and interpretation; and, the psychological safety and ethics inherent in the reciprocal sharing of such powerful materials.

Kalyanlakshmi Chitta, Manish Khare and Savita Kulkarni

This chapter focuses on the methodologies adopted by individual work efforts in pursuit of chosen objectives while operating within the larger systemic framework and attempts to conceptualise the situations in which misalignment or conflict develops in individual and systemic goals and its resultant impact. The value added by the system as a whole, beyond that contributed independently by the parts, is created primarily by the relationship among the parts. In essence, a system constitutes a set of interrelated components working together with a common objective- fulfilling some designated need. Every system has some objectives and prescribes an appropriate methodology to achieve them. Similarly, the individual components participating in the working of the system do so with some individual objectives. As long as objectives of the individual components are concentric to, and methodology adopted in pursuit of these objectives is in alignment with that prescribed by the system, the result will be synergetic. Misalignment in the functioning of individual stakeholders vis-à-vis the system arising on account of A. Conflict in short or long-term objectives, B. Adoption of inappropriate methods by individuals to realize their objectives, C. Inability of system to effectively put in place a mechanism to check anti-systemic individual practices, D. Adoption of sub-optimal strategies by system to realise its objectives that sets a self-defeating process into motion, E. Non-development of institutional environment fostering circular self-regulation through affiliation at informal levels among components beyond professional engagement. Will in the long-term culminate into a situation where individuals are able to advance their misaligned objectives at the expense of the system. This may be reflected in the distortion of internal dynamics wherein the overall value added by the system is lesser than the cumulative benefit (real or perceived) derived by individual stakeholders; a situation that the chapter understands is governed by anti-synergy.

Petra Jasurkova and Jaroslav Vancat

Modernist deconstruction of classical Renaissance view has created conditions for the image to be understood as a multi-relational structure, constructed on the basis of mutual relations of image elements (Klee), all of which were only created visual objects (Cézanne). Modern art styles from Cubism to Abstract Painting can thus be regarded as a systematic research of creative content the possibilities of visual display as picture elements and their relationships to the spatio-temporal expression of ideas (Cubism), movement (Futurism) , construction (Constructivism and De Stijl) in harmony (Kupka, Delaunay) and psychological effects (from the Fauvism to Expressionism), etc. By applying the same method of creating relationships, this time between image objects (figures), Duchamp's trance object from its original environment and putting it into new contexts (ready-made), which continued to be systematically developed by the Surrealists. We do understand both levels as structurally linked and built on the principle of mutual relations of elements and objects. This has allowed us to develop pedagogical methodology and understand the content of the image based as operated by the students with visual objects and visual elements. The methodology, based on the examination of variations of these sessions is technically easily accessible with the application of vector image digital editors. It helps to understand visual concepts for ‘in-time’ media such as film and video and is a rational approach to support the development of creativity.