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Brendan Gillis

, jurisdiction, and sovereignty. The Conestoga might conceivably have claimed rights and privileges akin to those of colonial subjects, but any such assertion rested on ill-defined promises in decades-old treaties. In a series of “Conditions or Concessions” placed on the earliest settlers of the colony in July

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Magdalena M. Martin Martinez

This book deals with the question of national sovereignty and States' participation in International Organizations, whether traditional or supranational ones. Although there has been much discussion on the problems posed by the transference of sovereignty, this volume provides an original insight in that transfer of state sovereignty is approached as a dynamic process that can be divided into three different phases. Part one, called `the initial phase', focuses on the examination of the domestic legal basis for the transfer of state sovereignty. Part two, `the transfer phase', investigates how the process of transfer evolves within the core of two International Organizations: the United Nations and the European Communities. Part three, `the post-transfer phase', analyses the States' responses to the effects and consequences of the transfer of sovereignty.
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Joanne Paul

The English Civil War is commonly viewed as a conflict largely concerned with questions about the proper location of sovereignty; however, underlying these claims were arguments about the nature, and proper source, of counsel. By examining the writings of Thomas Hobbes and his opponent Henry

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Aspects of Sovereignty

Sino-Swedish Reflections

Series:

Edited by Per Sevastik

The overall objective of this unique volume is to understand what effects globalisation has had on the traditional views of sovereignty, seen from a
Chinese and European, primarily Swedish, perspective. Does the cultural-historical approach have any value in China today or is it only seen
as political reminiscence with very little real effects in the wake of globalisation? What are the differences between different understandings of
sovereignty in different parts of the world? How has the concept changed generally because of a different international structure, with for example
regional integration gaining in importance not least in Europe? These are some of the underlying questions being addressed in this anthology.
The authors are Chinese and Swedish scholars who offer reflections from the perspective of legal philosophy, public international law, international human rights law, economic law and international relations.
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Sigrid Winkler

Introduction Taiwan and Mainland China 1 joined the World Trade Organization (WTO) virtually at the same time, but as separate members. Already in the accession process, Taiwan’s contested sovereignty was a reason for China to oppose Taiwan’s WTO entry. In the process of the negotiations

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Matthew Rojansky

Ukraine’s sovereignty and the resolution of its conflict with Russia, a key to de-escalating growing tension across the wider European and Euro-Atlantic space. What follows is a closer examination of the conditions and steps necessary for Washington to promote more effective management—and potential

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Stefan Kadelbach and David Roth-Isigkeit

process, the state has the ultimate say so that the universality of rights is conditional upon their piercing of the state veil. The same argument applies vice versa for state sovereignty. A state’s capacity for political action is factually and legally constrained by its embeddedness in the

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Joshua Castellino and Elvira Domínguez Redondo

1 Introduction The contest between Korea and Japan over the determination of the sovereignty of the islets of Dokdo/Takeshima has been heating up over the past two decades, with attempts at bilateral engagement failing to provide a breakthrough. This old territorial conflict, fuelled by the

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Katrin Flikschuh

I Introduction Quentin Skinner has recently suggested that in chapter xvi of Leviathan Hobbes responds to democrats’ claims to popular sovereignty by sinking their argument into his: given its voluntary nature, subjects’ transfer of their rights to the sovereign ruler, though an act of

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Maximilian Jaede

relief. 12 However, the possibility of sovereignty acquired by conquest seems to allow for lasting reconciliation with former enemies. Hobbes reasons in all of his main political works that the state is dissolved in the event of a successful enemy invasion, implying that individuals are free to submit