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forest. The most diverse nematode community was found in the meadow, diversity and abundance of nematodes were positively and significantly correlated in the successional sequence studied. The genera Rhabditis, Filenchus, Plectus, Acrobeloides, Aporcelaimellus, Panagrolaimus, Eudorylaimus, Meso

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genera, Rhabditis , Cephalobus , Plectus and Aphelenchoides , were recorded in all investigated birch stands (Table 2). The relatively high percentage of total nematode fauna was represented by the genera Acrobeloides , Wilsonema and Eudorylaimus (>3%) as well. The nematode abundance

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(Tobar Jiménez) * - Fed. Rep. Germany Helicotylenchus cf. microce,bhalus Sher * - Mozambique Heterodera schachtii Schmidt - Fed. Rep. Germany Aphelenchida Aphelenchoides saprophilus Franklin * - Fed. Rep. Germany Seinura tenuicaudata (de Man) * - Fed. Rep. Germany Rhabditida Acrobeloides nanus (de Man

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. W. SEINHORST: Propionic acid better than acetic acid for killing nematodes. Acrobeloides sp., Pratylenchus minyus, Rotylenchus uniformis, R. goodeyi and Tylenchorhynchus dubius killed as described by Seinhorst (1966) but by a hot mixture of formaldehyde 4%, pro- pionic acid 1% and water 95% (FP 4

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-feeding nematode Aphelenchoides sp. (FN F ), a bacterium Escherichia coli alone (B) or with a bacterial- feeding nematode Acrobeloides tricornus (BN B ), a com- bination of B and F (BF), and a combination of BN B and FN F (BFN BF ). Cladosporium herbarum is a preferred food for Aphelenchoides (Ikonen, 2001). The

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carpocapsae was kindly pro- vided by SDS Biotech K.K. (Tsukuba, Japan), and third- stage infective juveniles were used. Acrobeloides thornei , Oscheius tipulae , Panagrolaimus rigidus and Pristionchus pacificus were provided by the Caenorhabditis Genetics Center (University of Minnesota, St Paul, MN, USA) and

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(bacterial feeders) Bunonema ( reticulatum, richtersi ) 3 3 4 3 3 6 4JY 4 2 3 1,6 3,3 1,1 13 Acrobeloides nanus 1 4 ­ 5 7D 6 5 5 7 6 0,4 1,7 13 110 Pseudacrobeles sp. ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ 1 ­ ­ + + Cephalobidae sp. ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ 2 ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ + + Panagrolaimus (sp.1, sp.2, sp.3) 3 5 6 4 5 5 6 7JY 6 6 0.8 1.3 3.4 28

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* (66-98) (59-96) (27-65) Overall density 538.2 ± 18.6 505.5 ± 15.0 394.7 ± 15.9 − 21 . 9 * (439-646) (399-593) (278.9-488) Non-parasitic nematodes Acrobeloides sp. 10.8 ± 1.5 9.4 ± 1.0 7.9 ± 1.1 − 16 . 0 * (4-24) (4-14) (2-18) Thornenema sp. 35.8 ± 3.3 32.6 ± 3.0 29.2 ± 2.8 − 10 . 4 * (22-54) (21

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times at three different temperatures for vari- ous species and genera in our own culture collection. Materials and methods O RIGIN OF NEMATODES Acrobeloides maximus DF5048, January 1989. Nebe, Senegal. Isolated by P. Baujard from semi-arid tropical soil. Aduncospiculum sp . JB120, December 1992

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solution for 8 and 24 hours in each case, did not affect either infectivity or reproduction of the nematode. The saprophagous nematodes killed by EPTC treatment were Acrobeles sp., Acrobeloides sp., Rhabditis sp., Chiloplacus sp., and Eudorylaimus sp. The present study opens out the possibility of

In: Nematologica