Search Results

You are looking at 51 - 60 of 530 items for :

  • All: "adaptation" x
  • Early Modern History x
Clear All

group to forced adaptation, migration or extinction, but could also prove a catalyst to an ethnogenesis that could not have occurred without the effects the Columbian exchange brought about by the missionaries. The so-called Lagoon March (Comarca Lagunera) of the northeastern borderlands of New Spain

In: Journal of Early American History

, Shakespeare, in one sense an agent responsible for creating the play King Lear, has been transformed into a kind of owner, reference to whom allows critics and historians to determine somewhat arbitrarily whether a given adaptation is authentic.' Shakespeare's Lear ends up looking a little like David Hume

In: Journal of Early Modern History

, adaptation, and plagiarism within the Renaissance as the age of classicism and imitation ( imitatio ). Perhaps scholars of languages and literatures other than the ones represented here may regret this absence (Muslim World, South East Asia, South America), but these essays will certainly help them to deal

In: Journal of Early Modern History

broadly as “processes of sociocultural exchange and adaptation” that included “cultural interactions across social class and ethnicity” (6). She notes that in colonial history creolization has mostly been traced in plantation societies but claims that contraband networks were also important conduits for

In: Journal of Early Modern History

discussion of Shakespeare’s play. As the author rightly notes, eighteenth-century audiences would have been more familiar with Oroonoko as a play as stage adaptations proliferated, and this change in medium is also replicated by subtle changes in thematic emphasis in differing productions. As with Othello

In: Journal of Early Modern History

’ and ‘upon cultural adaptation’” (pp. 105–106). As a whole, this volume admirably demonstrates the benefits of bringing an Atlantic perspective to Louisiana histories and the potential of regional studies to reconfigure our understandings of larger-scale Atlantic processes, albeit within certain

In: Journal of Early American History

sixteenth-century heyday, arguing that while the Mediterranean was greatly aff ected by this Atlantic shift, the fi nanciers and merchants of the sea’s leading cities, Genoa and Venice, had maintained a certain unity by orchestrating adaptations to the changing world economy. Th e “geohistorical approach” in

In: Journal of Early Modern History

from Erasmus directly as an auctoritas in his Theotimus , it is Rabelais, who hardly mentions Erasmus, who turns out to be much more loyal to Erasmus’ philological project. Robert Kilpatrick turns his attention to Montaigne’s appropriation and adaptation of Erasmus’ strategy of updating his

In: Erasmus Studies

these compilations consulted by both the Bollandists and Don Quixote alike? Flowers were a uniquely Iberian genre, aware of European efforts to collect the lives of saints and then arrange them according to the liturgical year. Originally an adaptation of the medieval “best-seller,” the Golden Legend

In: Journal of Early Modern History

Introduction The prize of piracy is economic, but as a historic phenomenon, the dynamic that creates it is political. 1 The political history of the early modern world is above all a history of the quest for sovereignty. The development, adaptation, and diffusion of concepts and projects of

In: Journal of Early Modern History