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Moreover, some countries, such as Cyprus, Ireland, Georgia, Portugal and Slovakia, prohibit the creation of human embryos for research purposes and for the procurement of stem cells through the ratification of the 1997 Council of Europe Convention on Human Rights and Biomedicine . 41 See e.g. Austria

In: European Journal of Health Law

professional subject under national law or rules established by national competent bodies to the obligation of profes- sional secrecy or by another person also subject to an equivalent obligation of secrecy”. 5 Th e Council of Europe Convention on Human Rights and Biomedicine is not very explicit with regard

In: European Journal of Health Law

Europe Convention on Human Rights and Biomedicine, is not as specific, and might not be as comprehensive, as the Directive on the issue of what information must be provided to a subject if duties of information provision are to be discharged. 20) Op. Cit. n.8 at para. 8.45 21) Although it should be noted

In: European Journal of Health Law

law’. In the same vein, Article 1 of the Council of Europe Convention on Human Rights and Biomedicine stipulates that ‘Parties to this con- vention shall protect the dignity and identity of all human beings and guarantee everyone, without discrimination, respect for their integrity and other rights

In: European Journal of Health Law

1997 Council of Europe’s Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Dignity of the Human Being with regard to the Application of Biology and Medicine (known as “the European Convention on Human Rights and Biomedicine”). 30 The rights stipulated in those instruments include among others: the

In: European Journal of Health Law

Council of Europe Convention on Human Rights and Biomedicine). Art. 8 of the European Convention on Human Rights in addition mentions economic well-being of the country, public order and morals as well as national security as possibilities for restricting human rights. 7 These exceptions were not

In: European Journal of Health Law

2.1 Commonly Shared Principles The principles of, and approaches towards patients’ rights are commonly shared by European countries. 6 Rights of the patient are specifically addressed in the Council of Europe Convention on Human Rights and Biomedicine (1997). 7 2.2 Mobility in Europe In

In: European Journal of Health Law

on health issues. Lithuania has ratif ied the Council of Europe Convention on Human Rights and Biomedicine, in 2002, and the Additional Protocol to the Convention on Human Rights and Biomedicine on the Prohibition of Cloning of Human Beings was subsequently signed in 1998. While drawing up the Law on

In: European Journal of Health Law

. This right is covered by a number of human rights instruments 7 especially Article 8 of the European Convention on Human Rights and Article 10 of the European Convention on Human Rights and Biomedicine (CBM). 8 This right establishes the principle that everyone is entitled to the right to privacy and

In: European Journal of Health Law

safeguards can be found in the 1997 European Convention on Human Rights and Biomedicine, 15 and in the 2014 eu Regulation on Clinical Trials, 16 which will replace the currently applicable 2001 eu Clinical Trials Directive 17 in 2016. 2.1 Council of Europe The Council of Europe’s Convention on

In: European Journal of Health Law