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clinical trials under the revised Declaration of Helsinki and the European Convention on Human Rights and Biomedicine”, European Journal of Health Law , 2000, 105-121; S. Gevers, “Medical research involving human subjects: towards an international legal framework?”, European Journal of Health Law , 2001

In: European Journal of Health Law

, this was followed by UNESCO’s Universal Declaration on the Human Genome and Human Rights . 27 Like the European Convention on Human Rights and Biomedicine , 28 the Declaration recognized the right not to know (s. 5) but also that “genetic data associated with an identified person …. must be held

In: European Journal of Health Law

tissue for transplant or research purposes 15 is absolutely necessary. Lastly, the European Convention on Human Rights and Biomedicine does not forbid the use of fetal tissue for grafting; only the creation of human embryos for research is strictly prohibited (Art. 18.2). e. The ‘line’ for an organ In

In: European Journal of Health Law

. This right is covered by a number of human rights instruments 7 especially Article 8 of the European Convention on Human Rights and Article 10 of the European Convention on Human Rights and Biomedicine (CBM). 8 This right establishes the principle that everyone is entitled to the right to privacy and

In: European Journal of Health Law

, it is an obligation to mention the manipulation on the label. There is also international regulation to fall back upon, including the European Convention on human rights and biomedicine and the EU Charter of fundamental rights mentioned in para. 7. After all, now that financial reward for blood

In: European Journal of Health Law

legislation in Europe. There are no common European standards on how the law should deal with termination of pregnancy. Abortion is conspicuously absent from the European Convention on Human Rights and Biomedicine (1997); apparently, it was not possible to reach a minimum of consensus on this subject. Under

In: European Journal of Health Law

Moreover, some countries, such as Cyprus, Ireland, Georgia, Portugal and Slovakia, prohibit the creation of human embryos for research purposes and for the procurement of stem cells through the ratification of the 1997 Council of Europe Convention on Human Rights and Biomedicine . 41 See e.g. Austria

In: European Journal of Health Law

), the European Convention on protection of human rights (1950, article 3), the UN International Covenant on civil and political rights (1966, article 7). The Council of Europe Convention on human rights and biomedicine (1996) also includes some general principles on the subject. The Protocol addresses

In: European Journal of Health Law

for this example. 7. See for more detail ALRC (2003): para. 10.1 to 10.6. 8. See, for example, Article 11 of the Council of Europe Convention on Human Rights and Biomedicine (Oviedo, 4.IV.1997) which holds that “Any form of discrimination against a person on grounds of his or her genetic heritage is

In: European Journal of Health Law

2.1 Commonly Shared Principles The principles of, and approaches towards patients’ rights are commonly shared by European countries. 6 Rights of the patient are specifically addressed in the Council of Europe Convention on Human Rights and Biomedicine (1997). 7 2.2 Mobility in Europe In

In: European Journal of Health Law