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, whether R. Shem Tov's assessment of the Kohen brothers' prowess in talmudic/lega1 studies was made relative to the official position and standing of R. Moses or whether this was an absolute indication that the Kohen brothers were in fact not "talmidei ~akhamiff/' as Scholem asserts. In any event, there is

In: The Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy

’histoire ] by realizing a just world . . . The sacri fi ces and deeds to which this realization of justice invites human beings give back a body to the spirit that animated the prophets and the Talmud.” 12 He makes the same point elsewhere: “The Jewish people was thirsty for its land and its State because of the

In: The Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy

and punctuate the weave of valleys and gullies that wind among the moun- tains of the Galilee. During the middle ages, gravesites associated with Biblical, Talmudic or mystical heroes came to serve as centers for prayer 6 and the development of communities. 3 In Rothkrug's words, this portable

In: The Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy

are certain contemporary scholars who try to extend another argument of the Talmudic Sages. David Polish, for example, argues that the chief error of the thinkers and scholars, including Kierkegaard, who have commented on the Aquedah consists in beginning their analyses only from Genesis 22. 24 But

In: The Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy

Neusner, characteristic of the talmudic sages’ understanding of history. 2 Consider the following fragment from Pesiqta de Rav Kahana ( vii : xi .3): R. Levi in the name of R. Hama bar Hanina: “He who exacted vengeance from the former [oppressor] will exact vengeance from the latter. “Just as

In: The Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy

's talmudic writings. Noting the involvement of the Jewish existentialists in texts and rituals in their later work the Rosenzweig scholar Leora Barnitzky 5 has suggested that we can move these thinkers closer to postliberal thought by reading their work backwards from the end to the begin- ning. This

In: The Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy

particular amongst the Hasidim, whose origin is shrouded in mystery. I refer to the practice of not studying Torah on Christmas Eve. This custom is found nowhere in Talmudic or medieval rab- binic literature, and it is difficult to determine when it first came into existence. 1 However, even before

In: The Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy

-39. 26 See ib., p. 92 11. 5-16; p. 15611. 118-121; p. 181 11. 69-79. Changing Fronts in the Controversies 67 the category of that "Greek wisdom" whose study the Talmud had forbidden. 2 7 Indeed, having absolutely rejected the authority or value of science, the traditionalists went so far as to demand

In: The Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy

reliability of Rabbinic tradition Rabbanites and Karaites differed first and foremost in their attitude toward the authority of the Oral Law as embodied in the Talmud. Anan's son Saul was mentioned by Judah Halevi and Abraham Ibn Daud, but we have no indication that he ever wrote any compositions. Abraham Ibn

In: The Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy

critique of Cohen’s con fi dence in reason. The fi nal essay by Lawrence Kaplan examines Cohen in relation to R. Joseph Soloveitchik. The question of concern is why Cohen ignored the second and higher form of repentance attributed to Resh Lakish in the Talmud—repentance from love that transforms past sins

In: The Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy