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case if the actors meet again later to conclude other agreements, or if there is a strong supranational/policy entrepreneur who can overcome these problems. 20 Both elements are also present in the negotiations on the establishment of the EEAS. A more ‘problem-solving’ type of negotiation is thus also

In: The Hague Journal of Diplomacy

Russia and China in order to compare and contrast the public diplomacy media outreach strategies, goals and results in the two countries. Without diminishing the importance of the original project, the Russian media’s coverage of the Fifth brics Summit deserves to be presented to broader academic

In: The Hague Journal of Diplomacy

that it has nothing to do with domestic publics; a preconception that has been present since the term’s inception and has since become the norm. While still present, this scepticism is waning in tandem with more flexible understandings such as in ‘double-edged’, ‘multi-actor’, ‘new’, and ‘polylateral

In: The Hague Journal of Diplomacy

-sized states, Canada, Norway, institutional change 1) An earlier version of this article was presented to the International Conference on Multi- stakeholder Diplomacy, Malta, 11-13 February 2005. For comments and suggestions I am grateful to Elin H. Allern, Daryl Copeland, John E. Fossum, Ljupco Gjorg jinski

In: The Hague Journal of Diplomacy

recent developments in the global information sphere that present new challenges for public diplomacy practitioners and, indeed, for academic analysis in the years ahead. If any consensus exists among the authors, it is that the present state of affairs across the globe constitutes a crisis, which is

In: The Hague Journal of Diplomacy

of public diplomacy must be grounded in an understanding of the present. While most observers perceive a moment of crisis today, there is a range of views on its exact extent. Certainly, one element is the return to great-power rivalry as a central element in international relations. There is also

In: The Hague Journal of Diplomacy
Following some ten years as a practicing lawyer and consultant, Kirstyn Inglis has been researching the evolving legal practice of EU enlargement for over ten years. This book, succinctly, introduces this evolving practice, covering ‘transitional arrangements’ in accession treaties, the Treaty of Lisbon, recent European Court case law, the specific governance challenge of incorporating Bulgaria and Romania and the strategy for future enlargements to bring in the Western Balkans and Turkey. In part two, the examples of the environment and the agri-food acquis are explored, including the analysis of the transitional arrangements in practice. Overall, the diversity and complexity of the pre-accession and post-accession challenge of enlargement becomes apparent, as do key challenges for the evolution of the acquis communautaire in an enlarging Union at a time when Croatia is waiting to sign its own accession treaty.

national armaments of atomic weapons and of all other major weapons adaptable to mass destruction’. 2 Today, the possession and renunciation of nuclear weapons continues to present a central topic of consideration for the United Nations ( un ), addressed through multiple forums, including the unga First

In: The Hague Journal of Diplomacy

, especially when considering the characteristics of the New Public Diplomacy. In his final chapter, ‘Shaping Diplomacy’s Future’, Seib returns to a broader point of view, recognizing that digital tools are not the only changes that public diplomacy is facing at present and in the short-term future. He also

In: The Hague Journal of Diplomacy

and the post-Cold War period. The justification for this decade-centred approach in capturing diplomatic history, as Iokibe persuasively argues in the introduction (p. 10), is the overall focus of the volume on presenting major events as the basis for future trends rather than simply as a review of

In: The Hague Journal of Diplomacy