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does not match Levinas’s phenomeno- logical influences and that his mystical attention to Kabbalah is rejected by Levinas, who preferred Talmudic sources. Furthermore, Benjamin and Levinas wrote during different historical periods: the “pile of ruins” watched by the horrified “Angel of History” in 1940

In: The Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy

this time. CIS I:xxii~xxiii.) Weiss~Rosmarin, however, points out that the speed with which Cohen's father went through the service was typical of Talmudic scholars, and that this is hardly an indication of lack of piety. She suggests that Rosenzweig was unfairly judging Cohen's Judaism by the

In: The Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy

, Merkabah Mysticism, and Talmudic Tradition (]TS, New York, 1960) p. 71. See also Idel, The Mystical Experience [note 26 above], p. 157 note 137. 38 See especially Sefer ijaJidism, par. 362 p. 268. Gazing at the Head 279 divine names found also in the Biblical texts, included in the phylacteries. Is the

In: The Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy

, Massachusetts. 2 As to Levinas' Jewish writings, one thinks of his annual Talmudic readings, nine of which have been collected together and translated into English as Emmanuel Levinas, Nine Talmudic Readings, translated by Annette Aronowicz (Bloomington, Indiana University Press, 1990), or the collection of

In: The Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy

this question see A.J. Hesche!, Theology of Ancient Judaism (London and New York: Soncino Press, 1962; Hebrew), ch. 10, and E.E. Urbach, The Sages, Their Concepts and Beliefs (Jerusalem: Magnes Press, 1975), pp. 304-314. My concern in this article is not with rabbinic thought but rather with post-talmudic

In: The Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy

, Introduction to the Talmud and Midrash [New York: Atheneum, 1969], 225). I define narrative midrash as a midrashic (i.e., interpretive) narrative that roughly follows the chronology of the biblical text, but includes many embellishments and digressions into other biblical passages. This term is meant to

In: The Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy

Maimonides throughout his life, frequently relying on the Mishnah Torah in order to select his Talmudic commentary and, most signi fi cantly, that “a good number” of his unpublished texts that are still unavailable are devoted to Maimonides; see his Emmanuel Levinas: His Life and Legacy (Pittsburgh: Duquesne

In: The Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy

as a stable concept, and interrogate its functions within one sugya or Talmudic unit of discussion. I will examine the ways that b Sandhedrin 74a-75a - one of the central halakhic or legal discussions of kiddush hashem in the Bavli - thematizes desire, power, pleasure, love and sex. This will move my

In: The Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy

that he began forty years prior in his essay “Die Nächstenliebe im Talmud” (The Love of the Neighbor in the Talmud), 72 and continued in his analysis of Ernst Troeltsch, as we will see in what follows. Cohen and Troeltsch In Cohen’s quest to find a satisfactory way of incorporating the results

In: The Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy

knowledge of the commandments, and analysis of the ways of the [scriptural] verses and the methods of inference, [brought] in 68 chapters.” 1 The treatise’s scope is actually wider. It discusses principles of epistemology; methods of logical, judicial, and talmudic inference; ways of biblical exegesis and

In: The Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy