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Extraordinary Experiences and Religious Beliefs

Deconstructing Some Contemporary Philosophical Axioms

Gregory Shushan

experience “now looks like a curio from the past rather than something to be taken seriously. It is a magic feather in which we once believed.” While such critics often make valuable points, there are theoretical and methodological problems with both the construction of their theories, and the ways in

Christopher I. Lehrich

science, this methodology fails on multiple grounds. But Nattiez does not conclude here—on the contrary, he argues that because of its “intentional” character, Lévi-Strauss’s approach must be analyzed as a mode of hermeneutics. If his interpretations cannot be evaluated in strictly scientific terms, this

M. Andersen, U. Schjoedt, K.L. Nielbo and J. Sørensen

reasons for this diversity of theories is that it is incredibly hard to test specific hypotheses on mysticism, because a range of methodologies suffers from inherent problems when faced the challenge to investigate mysticism as a psychological phenomena. 1.2 Methodological Challenges in the Field

Thinking Religion Through Things

Reflections on the Material Turn in the Scientific Study of Religion\s

Peter J. Bräunlein

religion through things” will be addressed. The central questions are: What approaches in the study of material religion can be detected thus far, and to what extent are they able to answer the challenges of New Materialism and Posthumanism? What methodological instruments are available to cope with the

Mananne Sawicki

Archaeology as space technology: Digging for gender and class in holy land Mananne Sawicki Abstract Contemporary archaeology offers three methodological options: the classl- cal, the processual or scientific, and the post-processual. I propose a stance of "chastened realism" that integrates

Ann Burlein

what cognitive/ neuro-scientific accounts of religion look like when viewed through the lens of a Foucault-style history of science. I will start by extracting three methodological moves from Foucault’s The Birth of the Clinic . I see these moves as central to the formation of any empiricism

Jon L. Berquist

interact in ways that could lead to fuller understandings of their underlying assumptions. Isaiah 56-66 provides a test-case for the comparison of method, with a focus on the ways in which various newer methodologies can interpret the differences within the text. Whereas philo- sophical and literary

Jon L. Berquist

interact in ways that could lead to fuller understandings of their underlying assumptions. Isaiah 56-66 provides a test-case for the comparison of method, with a focus on the ways in which various newer methodologies can interpret the differences within the text. Whereas philo- sophical and literary

“It Was Like That When I Came In”

David Sloan Wilson’s Use of the Category ‘Religion’

Nathan Colborne

with other groups. Part of Wilson’s argument relies on an analysis of a randomized sample of religions that he selects from Mircea Eliade’s The Encyclopedia of Religion . One significant methodological problem with this strategy is that Wilson offloads the work of defining the boundaries of each

Jeppe Sinding Jensen

-outsider distinction is primarily a politically expedient construction of no methodological value and how we may see that it hinges on premises that are philosophically deficient. It seems likely that the insider-outsider problem is what Rudolf Carnap dubbed a “pseudo-problem” (2003, [1928]). The distinction obscures