Search Results

You are looking at 81 - 90 of 113 items for :

  • All: "prediction" x
  • Ancient History x

Feldman, Louis H.

Harrington (1978:205), commenting on a 4Q “Messianic Text” found at Qumran, that presents a fragment of a prediction of a new-born child, suggest that it may be related to descriptions of the birth of Noah such as are reflected in Josephus.10Josephus’ picture of Noah as a preacher is that of a Cynic or Stoic

Begg, Christopher T. and Spilsbury, Paul

speaks more vividly of his intended “tearing the kingdom out of the hand of your [Solomon’s] son.”33Josephus adds this reference to a “revolt” by a portion of the people against Solomon’s son. He thereby makes the prophet’s announcement a more precise prediction of the actual course of events—see the

Begg, Christopher T. and Spilsbury, Paul

’s prediction of Abijah’s demise and the queen’s carrying out of her commission to inform her husband of the prophet’s message (see 8.272)., ⇐ Previous Contents ⇑Next ⇒

Begg, Christopher T. and Spilsbury, Paul

δόξαν ὁμοῦ θειότητος παρὰ τοῖς ὄχλοις ἀποφέρεσθαι.and while the other prophets predicted bad news and because of this were intolerable to the kings and the public, Daniel was a prophet of good news to them,19 so that from the auspiciousness of his predictions he draw favor from all, and obtained from

Barclay, John M.G.

would come on him and on the king, if they were seen being oppressed,35 and he added a prediction36 that some people would ally themselves with the polluted people and rule Egypt for thirteen years.37 He did not dare say this to the king in person, but left a document about all this, then killed himself

Begg, Christopher T. and Spilsbury, Paul

Tiberius (Ant 18.217, 222), the Delphic oracle (Apion 2.162), and soothsayers in general (War 2.112; Ant 17.345; Gnuse 1996: 32). In War 4.625 Vespasian refers to Josephus’ own μαντείαι, i.e. “predictions,” and Josephus uses the related term προμαντεύσαιτο for himself in War 3.405. On Josephus’ use of this

Begg, Christopher T. and Spilsbury, Paul

with the 70 years of exile prophesied by Jeremiah (Jer 25:11). In Ant. 11.2 (cf. Ezra 1:1) Josephus cites Jeremiah’s prediction that “after they had served Nebuchadnezzar and his descendants and survived this servitude for seventy years he would restore them to their ancestral land” (Spilsbury, BJP 6

Begg, Christopher T.

David’s appended prayer for God’s protection (26:24), as well as Saul’s response with its “benediction” of David and prediction of the great future that awaits him (26:25a); compare his omission of David’s earlier words to Saul in 26:17b-20. In both instances, Josephus’ compression of the 2 parties

Barclay, John M.G.

constantly in attendance on Vespasian and Titus is necessary for his argument that he was well informed about the Roman side in the War, but is clearly exaggerated and extremely implausible. In War 3.399-402 Josephus records only one encounter with Vespasian during this whole period (the famous prediction of

Begg, Christopher T. and Spilsbury, Paul

:19b (LXX BL 20:19b add mention of “swine” having consumed Naboth’s blood and the prediction that prostitutes will bath in the king’s blood [see 1 Kgs 22:38). In so doing, he places the announcement on the lips of Elijah (rather than of God speaking to Elijah, as in 21:19b) and turns it into a response