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Author: Willem Frijhoff

, and Albany, N.Y.: SUNY Press, 2009). 2 Stadsarchief Amsterdam [City Archive of Amsterdam] (abbreviated SAA), Archief Nederlands Hervormde Kerkenraad [Archive of Dutch Reformed Consistory] (PA 376), inv. no. 5, p. 157. 3 A. Eekhof, Jonas Michaëlius, Founder of the Church in New Netherland: His Life and

In: Journal of Early American History
Author: Matteo Lazzari

or sisters. On the contrary, he provided accurate information about a paternal uncle, named Gaspar Riveros, who was living in San Cristobal de La Havana, Cuba in the 1650s. His uncle “is sixty years old, he does not have any office and he is a knight of San Cristobal; he is married to a woman called

In: Journal of Early American History
Author: Sophie H. Jones

memorial to highlight that ‘the change from a very plentiful living on a farm highly improved to a wilderness in advanced life is really hard. ’ Ibid. AO 12/25, 373–81 (quoted p. 374); David Bell, Loyalist Rebellion in New Brunswick: A Defining Conflict for Canada’s Political Culture (Halifax, NS

In: Journal of Early American History
Author: Agnès Delahaye

negatively as the downside of Winthrop’s dilemma structuring the story, “the same large paradox that had troubled Winthrop from the beginning, the paradox that required a man to live in the world without being of it.” Running and managing the Company and the settlement, or living in the world, were both

In: Settling the Good Land

the conception of the true church. It was “a word St. Paul had used to describe the goal of his evangelism (1 Cor. 3:14; 2 Cor. 13:10),” and to the reformers “it denoted the church as ‘a living, growing thing,’ a house or building constructed out of ‘living stones’ made so by the Holy Spirit” (48

In: Journal of Early American History
Author: Agnès Delahaye

decent workers themselves were also halted in their progress by the concentration of wealth in the hands of the landed few. Their English existence was a form of oppression, “compared with the easiness, plainness, and plentifulness in living in those remote places” in America, where “every man repress

In: Settling the Good Land
Author: Aaron J. Palmer

population also nearly doubled, growing from 25,000 in 1750 to 49,066 in 1770. However, despite similar growth rates, the black popu- lation was 65% higher than the white population, and blacks made up over 60% of the colony’s population, Peter Coclanis, Th e Shadow of a Dream: Economic Life and Death in the

In: Journal of Early American History
Author: Heather Hatton

Haudenosaunee orators were reacting to, what historical and geo-political circumstances motivated their use of the Chain narrative, will aid interpretation and allow for a deeper understanding of this aspect of metaphorical language. 18 Using a similar approach Mark Walters has argued that the Covenant

In: Journal of Early American History
Author: Agnès Delahaye

religious and cultural values that motivated it—mainly ascetic Protestantism and its work ethic—leaving aside the institutional development of the structure that made settlement possible. 2 There are only a handful of institutional studies of the corporation, dating back to the first half of the

In: Settling the Good Land
Author: Phillip Reid

a uniform approach to the issue. There is evidence, as we have seen, for some propensity of American builders to build cheaper ships that did not last as long, and for some British yards to turn out more expensive ships that rewarded their owners with a longer service life. It is possible that

In: The Merchant Ship in the British Atlantic, 1600–1800